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November 2014

Poor Dental Hygiene Linked to Brain Tissue Degeneration

The strongest evidence to date that poor dental hygiene is linked to brain degeneration has emerged from a recent study at the University of Florida Dental College. While cardiologists have long known that the bacteria that causes gingivitis (gum disease) may enter the blood stream adding to  heart issues, there had been fewer studies to link Alzheimer’s or other dementia to oral health.

Read more on HealthCentral about the link between dental hygiene and brain health:

Support a caregiver or jump start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders e-mail Carol: 

 


Unearned Guilt Intrinsic to Most Caregiving

If ever there’s a group of people who suffer deeply from unearned guilt it’s caregivers. Whether you’re the parent of a vulnerable adult, an adult child of aging parents or the spouse of a vulnerable adult, you are bound to have your “if only” times where you are sucked into the quicksand of guilt. The reality is that most things you could have done differently wouldn’t have made a huge difference overall. Even if another approach would have made a difference, you can’t go back. Staying mired in guilt is counterproductive for you as well as your care receiver.

Read more on HealthCentral about how unearned guilt can affect caregivers and their care receivers:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer


Is This The Most Significant Dementia And Alzheimer’s Breakthrough In History?

 

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TED Talk in Miami Florida.

John Lewis, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor in the Department
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“This is not medical heresy. This is giving the body the building
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than treating a disease with drugs” Dr. Lewis said.

Continue reading "Is This The Most Significant Dementia And Alzheimer’s Breakthrough In History?" »


Sleepless in America: National Geographic Special Examines Relationship between Sleep and Alzheimer's

This Sunday, November 30th at 8 p.m. ET Sleepless in America will air on the National Geographic channel. Watch this clip where experts from leading health organizations such as NIH discuss the new research findings connecting lack of sleep to an increased risk in Alzheimer's disease due to the brain not receiving enough crucial sleep time to flush out the toxic chemicals.

 

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer

 


Thanksgiving: Finding Gratitude in Caregiving

This Thanksgiving – not necessarily the day you are wrestling with the turkey at one home while you cope with a disoriented parent in another – but during the holiday time, you may find that making a gratitude list can help you discover the blessings wrapped in the guise of caring for your loved one.   This exercise is one of the most effective tools I know of to relieve the frustrations that can come with “why me.” Self pity, even when seemingly justified, only drains our inner resources. Since we’re all human, I’d hazard a guess that few of us have gotten to this point in life without some serious episodes of self pity.

Read more on HealthCentral about finding gratitude in caregiving:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer


7 Suggestions for Caregivers' Self Care

A recent study found that adult children caring for their parents, as well as parents caring for chronically ill children, may have their life span shortened by four to eight years. Caregivers could conceivably alter these statistics if they practice reasonable self-care.

Watch slideshow on HealthCentral about caregivers and self-care:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer


Actress Loni Anderson Talks about Her Caregiving Journey

During the time that her career was just beginning to flourish, Loni Anderson was balancing her work on the television show “WKRP in Cincinnati” with caring for her mother who was suffering from COPD. This was not long after her father had passed away following his own battle with the disease. Loni has long wanted to share her own experience managing a career, family, and her caregiving duties that she knows is shared with many men and women who commit themselves to tending to the health of a family member. 

Read more on HealthCentral about Loni Anderson's caregiving journey: 

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer


Acceptance of Reality Precedes Gratitude

Dear Carol: My wife has had a stroke that’s left her mostly paralyzed on one side. She can’t speak well and she cries a lot. We’re in our 70s and have spent our lives as active church people. In fact, we’ve done our share of visiting hospitals and nursing homes representing the church. We’ve told people that what they are facing is their reality and that we will pray for them. We’ve told them to be grateful for what they have. Now, the shoe is on the other foot. I’m having a difficult time feeling grateful for anything at all. Instead I feel angry, exhausted, frustrated and frightened. How could I have been such a hypocrite all of these years? - Roger

Read more from Inforum about acceptance and gratitude in the face of sorrow:

Support a caregiver or jump start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders e-mail Carol: 


Photo Albums and Memory Books Helpful When Visiting Elders

Many people are reluctant to visit elders, whether they are in their homes or a facility, mainly because they wonder what they’ll talk about. While this reluctance is more of a worry if the elder has memory problems from dementia, it’s often a problem even when memory isn’t an issue. Since elders by definition have many decades of life to their credit, they will likely enjoy looking back on the past.

Read more on HealthCentral about memory books and photo albums as an aid for reminiscence: 

Related post: Memory Box Valuable Tool for People with Alzheimer’s

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer

 


Let’s Change the Way We Care for People With Serious Illness - Now

The following message is an essay by Michael D. Fratkin, MD on the need for end-of-life planning and compassionate care.

It’s personal. 

When we hear that we have a terrible illness that will shorten our life, it’s personal.  When we learn about the benefits and trade-offs of the tests and procedures that will decide what treatments and medicines may help us, it’s personal.   As we make our way through side effects, complications, insurance plans, phone calls, waiting rooms, pharmacies, labs, radiology departments, billing departments, emergency rooms, intensive care units, medical jargon, bad news, good news, family conflict, family meetings, caregivers, nursing homes, physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, psychotherapy, medication lists, medication interactions, medication errors, advance directives, wills, and the many losses, it’s personal.

Our living and dying are not medical. While it’s a natural truth that we all die, the last chapter of life is better centered in our homes and with our families.

We need guidance, not guidelines.  As we face to hardest challenge there is, we want to be seen as we see ourselves…as the people we are with the people that love us.  We want to chart our own course on our own terms.  We want healthcare providers that understand that we are not malfunctioning machines, exploitable consumers, or anything less than people like they are.  We want to get the most possible benefit from medical technology and we need help to avoid the many pitfalls our fragmented and complex healthcare system.

It’s personal.

ResolutionCare is just such a team of professionals providing such care to people in their homes, and sharing this perspective to improve care wherever people with serious illness seek value in our healthcare system.

Continue reading "Let’s Change the Way We Care for People With Serious Illness - Now" »