« August 2015 | Main | October 2015 »

September 2015

Stress and Alzheimer’s: More Evidence Strengthens the Link

Brain6Stress has long been considered a major risk for developing Alzheimer’s, but there hasn’t been any real understanding as to why this is so. Now, researchers at the Center for Translational Research in Neurodegenerative Disease at the University of Florida think that they’ve come closer to discovering the connection.

Read more on HealthCentral about stress and its effect on the brain:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer


Wishing an Ill Loved One Could Die Implies Compassion

LoneEagle

Dear Carol: My mom survived cancer in her mid-years, but since developing dementia she’s also had to battle three rounds of pneumonia. It seems that each illness she’s survived has diminished her. She’s now in late stage Alzheimer’s and when I look at her sitting in a chair but not knowing anyone or even understanding what is happening when she is washed, fed and comforted, all I can think of is why can’t she die. I feel terrible about this. I read about people who would give anything to have their parents back no matter what shape they are in. How do I cope with my emotions?  - SMB

Read more on Inforum about wishing a loved one could die:

Support a caregiver or jump start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders e-mail Carol: 


8 Tips for Recognizing Pain in a Person with Dementia

FacialExpressionsPeople with dementia, especially advanced dementia, often have a difficult time articulating pain. Sometimes they may not be cognitively aware that pain is the source of their distress. Therefore, it’s our responsibility, as those who provide for their care, to watch for signs of distress that may arise from pain.

View slide show on HealthCentral about recognizing pain in a person with dementia:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer


Address Hearing Loss Early To Protect the Brain

TunnelSince mild hearing loss is considered part of normal aging it's rarely treated until the loss is at a later stage. However, now that hearing loss is known to affect our risk of developing dementia, this casual approach needs to be reconsidered. 

Read more on HealthCentral about addressing hearing loss early:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer


Younger Onset Alzheimer’s Symptoms Different

LoneBirdWhen we think of Alzheimer’s symptoms we think of memory loss, yet this is not necessarily the case with younger onset Alzheimer's. Younger onset Alzheimer’s may present symptoms such as poor judgement and skewed thinking patterns before memory loss becomes evident. 

Read more on HealthCentral about how younger onset AD is different than traditional:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer


Music Therapy for Alzheimer's and Other Dementias

Guitar2Music therapy has come into its own during the last decade as caregivers, care facilities and hospice organizations have recognized the therapeutic power that music can have on ill and suffering people. This therapy has been successfully delivered by a single staff member playing a guitar for a residents’ sing-along, a specialized harpist playing for a hospice patient or downloaded playlists on iPods that can stimulate memories. 

Continue reading on HealthCentral about how music can help people with dementia:

Find local resources for walk-in tubs: 

Support a caregiver or jump start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders e-mail Carol: 


What are Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) and Why Do They Matter?

WomencaregivingTo help us understand ADLs, I asked Carmel Froemke for some clarification. Carmel has spent 25 years providing direct care and program management for individuals with disabilities, specializing in mental health rehabilitation. She’s now very close to obtaining her credentials as a Geriatric Care Manager. Below, Carmel answers our questions regarding activities of daily living:

Continue reading on Agingcare about Activities of Daily Living:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer


Predicting Alzheimer’s: Biological Age Overrides Chronological Age

ScientistIncreasingly, Alzheimer’s specialists and researchers stress the importance of early detection. In fact, most drugs now considered as possible methods for holding off Alzheimer’s symptoms seem to be dependent on starting the drug early – as much as a decade earlier than symptoms appear.   The question that travels hand in hand with these studies is who should start these drugs if they do prove to be effective? It’s not prudent to simply give the drugs to the whole aging population. 

 Read more on HealthCentral about biological ave vs. chronological age: 

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer


Caregivers Need To Be Conscious of Good Moments

FamilyDear Carol: Both of my parents have had significant health issues during the last few years. Lately things have been good. They live in their own home and I check on them daily. My problem is that I constantly feel like the other shoe is going to drop. Since their health scares I can’t seem to relax and enjoy the fact that they are doing well now. Instead, I live in fear of the next crisis. How do I get out of this mode? Sarah

Read more on Inforum about how to comfort a dying person:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer


Flu Kills: Protecting Our Elders

DriedPlantsFlu isn't just an inconvenience, especially among the elderly population. For expert information on how caregivers can help their elders stay healthy and if possible avoid the flu, I reached out to Martie Moore, R.N., MAOM, CPHQ, who is Chief Nursing Officer, Medline Industries, Inc. for some answers.  

Read more on HealthCentral about how flu affects the elderly:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer