Alternative treatments Feed

...The questions in Simpson’s newest book illuminate the bond between two generations of women — one just entering adulthood; the other approaching the years when one wonders how much of life remains. Are you afraid of dying? How do you want to be remembered? Is there anything that you really regret or wish you did differently when you were younger? What do you hope to live to see? These are the questions asked and answered with love and wisdom. Read more →


For many of us, a car is a sign of independence. But this emotional connection to our automobiles is part of what makes convincing a person that he or she is no longer capable of driving such a volatile battle. The longer adult children or others wait to discuss driving issues with a loved one, the harder it can be. Read more →


According to the National Cancer Society, the majority of bladder cancers occur in the older population, with the average age... Read more →


Dear Candid Caregiver: My mom passed two years ago and my dad hasn’t done well since. Recently he had a stroke. My sister, who lives 1,000 miles away, came out for mom’s funeral, and she also visited for a few days after dad’s stroke, but she has a job and a family and couldn’t stay long. Now, dad’s been diagnosed with vascular dementia. Realistically, I’m the sole caregiver. I have two teenaged children, a husband who is, so far, supportive, and a job.  Read more →


Dear Carol: My husband has been diagnosed with a slow-growing type of leukemia that is well controlled by medication. He takes several medications for other health problems, too, but he’s doing well physically considering the issues. He’s never been easy to get along with because he knows everything and can have an acid tongue, especially toward me. I have stood up for myself when I’ve needed to, and he used to calm down, and sometimes apologize. Now, though, he’s getting far worse. Our grown kids don’t want to be around him, and old friends are staying away. He rants at everyone. Is this normal crankiness? TG Read more →


When our elders are suffering from physical pain, mental stress, loneliness or the effects of ageism in our society, the result can be depression. Research done at Sweden’s Umeå University and reported on by Medical News Today finds that when group activities were introduced into the elders’ environments, depressive symptoms were often improved and the need for medication reduced or eliminated. Read more →


Rather than a drug or treatment, MEND is a protocol where patients made dramatic lifestyle changes. According to the ABC report, "They avoided simple carbs, gluten, and processed foods. They increased their fish intake, took yoga and meditated. They were instructed to take melatonin, get adequate sleep, incorporate vitamin B-12, vitamin D-3 and fish oil." Read more →


"Where's my college ring?" This had become Dad's mantra during some months of his early demented years. I knew he hadn't gotten a ring when he graduated from college. His college career was interrupted by World War II, then work and a family. He went back to school during his work career. I, at age fourteen, attended his college graduation. I suppose, with a family to support, he didn't think a college ring was important. He didn't order one. He never owned one. But no way would he believe that now, as a man in his late seventies with heavy-duty dementia Read more →


A dementia caregiver guide for navigating through delicate situations: Providing care for someone who lives with any type of dementia — whether it’s Alzheimer’s, vascular, Lewy body or any of the myriad incarnations — can be intimidating. We watch helplessly as someone we love changes dramatically in how they view the world, and in the words and actions that they can understand. These changes can lead to situations where we unintentionally say and do things that make life harder for everyone involved. Read more →


Let me start at the beginning: A couple of weeks ago, I attended a training program at Bethany Homes, a care facility near my home Read more →