Alternative treatments Feed

If the risk of a stroke or heart attack doesn’t scare us into controlling our blood pressure, surely a heightened risk for vascular dementia should. While Alzheimer’s is consented by experts as the most common form of dementia, vascular dementia follows closely behind in ranking. The two mixed together are also common, so we should consider ourselves at risk for dementia unless we have a healthy vascular system. Read more →


...Because of the lack of clarity over the years about whether or not people with dementia felt as much pain as those who did not have a cognitive disorder, other researchers have been looking at the concept. Ruth Defrin, PhD, of University of Tel Aviv calls learning about the pain levels of those who cannot speak for themselves “an imperative ethical goal. Read more →


A technique using a yoga pose while mediating was shown by modern methods to be as effective as memory enhancement training (MET). The results of the practices were scientifically proven by using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. The UCLA researchers recruited a group of 29 middle-aged and older adults who were shown to have MCI. The progress of these study participants was tracked with brain scans. Read more →


According to the Healthy Aging Program at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention(CDC) and the National Association of Chronic Disease Directors (NACDD), it is estimated that 20 percent of people age 55 years or older experience some type of mental health concern. These agencies say that the most common conditions include anxiety, severe cognitive impairment, and mood disorders such as depression or bipolar disorder. Mental health issues are often implicated as a factor in cases of suicide. Read more →


"What’s the difference between being a patient and being a 'person? Often, “patient” means you’re suffering. Something is wrong with you. Ideally, you would never be treated like this in your own home. As you try to do your best to manage the situation, you deserve respect over constant nagging." Read more →


Dysphagia is a swallowing impairment that can occur after someone has a stroke or any type of brain injury. Dysphagia is also a concern with Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis (MS), oral cancer, and many other injuries and diseases. However, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), dysphagia is also a growing concern in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). The NIH says that dysphagia “frequently leads to aspiration pneumonia, a common cause of death in this population, particularly in the later stage of AD.” Read more →


When our elders are suffering from physical pain, mental stress, loneliness or the effects of ageism in our society, the result can be depression. Research done at Sweden’s Umeå University and reported on by Medical News Today finds that when group activities were introduced into the elders’ environments, depressive symptoms were often improved and the need for medication reduced or eliminated. Read more →


When it comes to Alzheimer’s disease, a number of researchers think that it’s time to reconsider the idea of infection as a root cause. Scientists are now pointing to studies that reveal the presence of a microbe as a possible trigger for the disease. The theory is that microbes "find their way into the brain via the bloodstream and lie dormant until triggered by aging, immune system decline or by different types of stress…once they are activated, the microbes then damage brain cells - either directly or via inflammation.” Read more →


Dear Carol: My dad has aggressive prostate cancer that has spread to his liver and bones. His oncologist isn’t very communicative and when I asked about hospice care he said that’s up to us. He told us that Dad won’t get better but that he can keep treating him if we want. The treatments make Dad miserable. If they won’t help, what’s the point? I feel strongly that Dad needs hospice care and have been trying to talk my mom into it but she’s dragging her feet. How do we go about getting the service? Which one do we choose? Will Mom have to go on Medicaid to get it paid for? This is her biggest fear. – ST Read more →


Many people are genetically predisposed to developing certain diseases, among them diabetes, cancer, heart disease and Alzheimer’s. It’s natural to worry if you’ve watched family members endure the illnesses. However, the cortisol released in your body by chronic stress, which can be caused by worry, could increase your susceptibility. The fix? Be proactive. Limiting stress may not completely protect you from the disease that you dread, but it can help your overall health and, for some diseases, this could help you avoid a trigger. Where do you start? Read more →