Arts Feed

Alzheimer’s Documentary Sparks Controversy Over What Some See as Negativity

OlderCouple3According to the Alzheimer’s Association, more than 5 million people in the U.S. live with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and the price tag for the disease in 2016 was over $236 billion. Therefore, it isn’t surprising that the disease is often featured on news broadcasts and as a topic of documentaries. PBS has been particularly attentive to the issues of AD. In 2012, PBS aired a moving documentary about Lee Gorewitz, who became the focus of You’re Looking at Me Like I Live Here and I Don’t. This documentary takes the viewer into Gorewitz’ life as a resident in a memory unit. In 2014, they aired The Genius of Marian, a story about Pam White and her family as they came to grips with her early onset Alzheimer’s disease (EOAD). Both programs sparked emotion in viewers with much praise and little controversy.

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Read full article on HealthCentral about the controversy over "Every Minute Counts"

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“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer


Becoming Involved in Creative Arts Could Prevent or Delay Alzheimer's

ARTcanvasCompleting crosswords, making a habit of Sudoku and playing challenging brain games on the Internet have long been suggested as methods of .maintaining our cognitive health. These are all fine pursuits, but research by Mayo Clinic has shown that creative arts such as painting, drawing, and sculpting may protect the mind against cognitive decline even better than the commonly used forms of brain exercise.

Read more on HealthCentral about how the creative arts can help our brains:

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Having a Purpose Necessary for Quality of Life

ARTDear Carol: My dad has vascular dementia which is thought to be caused by a series of mini-strokes. He lives in the memory unit of a fine nursing home. Dad needs a certain amount of nursing care and is at risk for frequent falls, but I believe that some of his depressed state could be relieved if he felt that had a purpose. Probably the same is true for several other residents. The staff is kind and devoted and I believe that they want the best for their residents, but choices for activities are limited. Do you have any ideas about how Dad and other higher functioning people could take part in life with more than visiting the zoo and playing bingo? Gary

Read more on Inforum about the need to have a purpose in life:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer

Global Alzheimer’s Study Now Enrolling


Pursing Creative Arts Could Help Delay Alzheimer's

ArtBrushesCompleting crosswords, making a habit of Sudoku and playing challenging brain games on the Internet have long been suggested as methods of maintaining our cognitive health. These are all fine pursuits, but recent research by Mayo Clinic has shown that creative arts such as painting, drawing and sculpting may protect the mind against cognitive decline even better than the commonly used forms of brain exercise.

Read more on HealthCentral about the therapeutic effects of the creative arts:

 

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer

Global Alzheimer’s Study Now Enrolling


Pursing Creative Arts Could Prevent or Delay Alzheimer's

ARTcanvasCompleting crosswords, making a habit of Sudoku and playing challenging brain games on the Internet have long been suggested as methods of maintaining our cognitive health. These are all fine pursuits, but recent research by Mayo Clinic has shown that creative arts such as painting, drawing and sculpting may protect the mind against cognitive decline even better than the commonly used forms of brain exercise. 

Read more on HealthCentral about creative arts and brain health:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer

Global Alzheimer’s Study Now Enrolling


Could Pursing Creative Arts Prevent or Delay Alzheimer's

ArtBrushesCompleting crosswords, making a habit of Sudoku and playing challenging brain games on the Internet have long been suggested as methods of maintaining our cognitive health. These are all fine pursuits, but recent research by Mayo Clinic has shown that creative arts such as painting, drawing and sculpting may protect the mind against cognitive decline even better than the commonly used forms of brain exercise. 

Read more on HealthCentral about creative arts and Alzheimer's:

Support a caregiver or jump start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders e-mail Carol: 

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The Broken Jar: A Video Of Alzheimer's and Art

This video showcases chronologically-arranged samples of the watercolors of Alzheimer's artist Lester E. Potts, Jr. (1928-2007). The art was created over a 4 year period while Potts was a patient at Caring Days, a dementia daycare center in Tuscaloosa, AL (now The Mal and Charlotte Moore Center). Prepare for a few tears.

 

Support a caregiver or jump start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders e-mail Carol:


Can Dementia Unleash Hidden Artistic Talent?

OceansidesmallerThe treatment of people with dementia has changed dramatically since I first became personally involved with the disease. It's now widely recognized that while cognitive abilities change with dementia, there is still an individual residing in this damaged body. Those in the arts, especially, have seen that concentrating on what people can do, rather than what they can't do, is vital for quality of life. As this attitude spreads, we're seeing that people with dementia often show talents that we never knew existed.

Read more on Agingcare about how the arts can help people with dementia:

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Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer


Arts Improve Life Quality for Stroke Survivors and People with Alzheimer’s

...Theater has also been used as a type of therapy for people with Alzheimer’s disease. NPR reported on an outreach program at the Lookingglass Theater in Chicago that offers people with Alzheimer’s the chance to take part in improv theater. With this type of theater, people are able to live in the moment, which is natural to someone with Alzheimer’s. There was no struggle to remember the past or determine what to do in the future. According to the article, most of the participants leave the theater with a refreshed feeling of accomplishment. 

Read more on HealthCentral about how the arts help improve quality of life:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer


Arts Improve Quality of life for Stroke Survivors and People with Dementia

Research continues to show that the arts enhance quality of life for people who have health problems, including Alzheimer’s disease and strokes. Patients who appreciated music, painting and theatre recovered better from their stroke than patients who did not…Patients interested in art had better general health, found it easier to walk, and had more energy. They were also happier, less anxious or depressed, and felt calmer. 

Read more about how arts can improve quality of life for elders:

Support a caregiver or jump start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders e-mail Carol: