Arts Feed

Learning to Back Off and Accept Risks While Caregiving

BicycleRisk...I am aware that many people under age 65 need assistance from their adult children or other sources because of health problems. That being said, having arthritis or heart issues, for example, doesn’t make a person cognitively impaired. Therefore, when we offer to help in these situations, the elders’ opinions and wishes must be taken into consideration. I know only too well that watching our parents get older is difficult. Ideally, they were once our anchors. No matter how difficult life became, there was comfort in knowing that our parents were around, even if they were half way across the country. Now, when we see their joints needing replacement, their skin wrinkling, perhaps even their memory recall slowing, we cringe. Whether or not we wish to admit it, we are afraid. We know that our parents are not immortal. One day we will be without them.

Read full article on Agingcare about why we need to step back and not interfere with our elders' happiness:

Support a caregiver or jump start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders of Minding Our Elders e-mail Carol


Pursuing Creative Arts Could Prevent or Delay Alzheimer's

ARTcanvasCompleting crosswords, making a habit of Sudoku and playing challenging brain games on the Internet have long been suggested as methods of maintaining our cognitive health. These are all fine pursuits, but recent research by Mayo Clinic has shown that creative arts such as painting, drawing, and sculpting may protect the mind against cognitive decline even better than the commonly used forms of brain exercise.

Read complete article on HealthCentral about how creative arts may help prevent Alzheimer's:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

The stories in this fine book showed us how others have gone through similar things with their families and that is somehow reassuring. There are some helpful suggestions but mostly there is the recognition that others went through the same thing. All we can do is our best. That is greatly reassuring during these difficult emotional times. If you are a caregiver, this is a must read. - Delores Edwards


Alzheimer’s Documentary Sparks Controversy Over What Some See as Negativity

OlderCouple3According to the Alzheimer’s Association, more than 5 million people in the U.S. live with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and the price tag for the disease in 2016 was over $236 billion. Therefore, it isn’t surprising that the disease is often featured on news broadcasts and as a topic of documentaries. PBS has been particularly attentive to the issues of AD. In 2012, PBS aired a moving documentary about Lee Gorewitz, who became the focus of You’re Looking at Me Like I Live Here and I Don’t. This documentary takes the viewer into Gorewitz’ life as a resident in a memory unit. In 2014, they aired The Genius of Marian, a story about Pam White and her family as they came to grips with her early onset Alzheimer’s disease (EOAD). Both programs sparked emotion in viewers with much praise and little controversy.

Photo credit: Think Stock

Read full article on HealthCentral about the controversy over "Every Minute Counts"

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer


Becoming Involved in Creative Arts Could Prevent or Delay Alzheimer's

ARTcanvasCompleting crosswords, making a habit of Sudoku and playing challenging brain games on the Internet have long been suggested as methods of .maintaining our cognitive health. These are all fine pursuits, but research by Mayo Clinic has shown that creative arts such as painting, drawing, and sculpting may protect the mind against cognitive decline even better than the commonly used forms of brain exercise.

Read more on HealthCentral about how the creative arts can help our brains:

Support caregivers by giving them copies  of Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories. ORDER EARLY before supplies run out.


Having a Purpose Necessary for Quality of Life

ARTDear Carol: My dad has vascular dementia which is thought to be caused by a series of mini-strokes. He lives in the memory unit of a fine nursing home. Dad needs a certain amount of nursing care and is at risk for frequent falls, but I believe that some of his depressed state could be relieved if he felt that had a purpose. Probably the same is true for several other residents. The staff is kind and devoted and I believe that they want the best for their residents, but choices for activities are limited. Do you have any ideas about how Dad and other higher functioning people could take part in life with more than visiting the zoo and playing bingo? Gary

Read more on Inforum about the need to have a purpose in life:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer

Global Alzheimer’s Study Now Enrolling


Pursing Creative Arts Could Help Delay Alzheimer's

ArtBrushesCompleting crosswords, making a habit of Sudoku and playing challenging brain games on the Internet have long been suggested as methods of maintaining our cognitive health. These are all fine pursuits, but recent research by Mayo Clinic has shown that creative arts such as painting, drawing and sculpting may protect the mind against cognitive decline even better than the commonly used forms of brain exercise.

Read more on HealthCentral about the therapeutic effects of the creative arts:

 

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer

Global Alzheimer’s Study Now Enrolling


Pursing Creative Arts Could Prevent or Delay Alzheimer's

ARTcanvasCompleting crosswords, making a habit of Sudoku and playing challenging brain games on the Internet have long been suggested as methods of maintaining our cognitive health. These are all fine pursuits, but recent research by Mayo Clinic has shown that creative arts such as painting, drawing and sculpting may protect the mind against cognitive decline even better than the commonly used forms of brain exercise. 

Read more on HealthCentral about creative arts and brain health:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer

Global Alzheimer’s Study Now Enrolling


Could Pursing Creative Arts Prevent or Delay Alzheimer's

ArtBrushesCompleting crosswords, making a habit of Sudoku and playing challenging brain games on the Internet have long been suggested as methods of maintaining our cognitive health. These are all fine pursuits, but recent research by Mayo Clinic has shown that creative arts such as painting, drawing and sculpting may protect the mind against cognitive decline even better than the commonly used forms of brain exercise. 

Read more on HealthCentral about creative arts and Alzheimer's:

Support a caregiver or jump start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders e-mail Carol: 

Find local resources for walk-in tubs:


The Broken Jar: A Video Of Alzheimer's and Art

This video showcases chronologically-arranged samples of the watercolors of Alzheimer's artist Lester E. Potts, Jr. (1928-2007). The art was created over a 4 year period while Potts was a patient at Caring Days, a dementia daycare center in Tuscaloosa, AL (now The Mal and Charlotte Moore Center). Prepare for a few tears.

 

Support a caregiver or jump start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders e-mail Carol:


Can Dementia Unleash Hidden Artistic Talent?

OceansidesmallerThe treatment of people with dementia has changed dramatically since I first became personally involved with the disease. It's now widely recognized that while cognitive abilities change with dementia, there is still an individual residing in this damaged body. Those in the arts, especially, have seen that concentrating on what people can do, rather than what they can't do, is vital for quality of life. As this attitude spreads, we're seeing that people with dementia often show talents that we never knew existed.

Read more on Agingcare about how the arts can help people with dementia:

Find local resources for walk-in tubs:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer