Brain Health, Alzheimer's, Dementia Feed

Dr. Gross’ newest book, “The Only Way Out is Through: A Ten-Step Journey from Grief to Wholeness,” is for everyone who experiences the often searing grief that accompanies the death of a loved one. Since Alzheimer’s is a terminal disease, as is the human condition, most HealthCentral readers are eventually put in a position where they must mourn the loss of their parent or spouse. Dr. Gross communicated with HealthCentral via email to provide our readers with guidance on how to go about getting through that grief. The interview has been lightly edited for length and flow. Read more →


The idea that some people can stay positive after receiving a dementia diagnosis seems surprising to many, yet when faced with adversity we have only two choices — make the best of what is in front of us, or live with negativity. No one is suggesting that living with a positive outlook after being given a diagnosis for any serious disease is easy, but negative thinking is risky for your overall health, while positive thinking has health benefits. Read more →


The type of heat exhaustion or mild dehydration that a middle-aged caregiver may feel during a heat wave is uncomfortable, but the same occurrence could be deadly for an elder. Because of the seriousness of overheating, some older people take a prescription drug that helps increase blood flow to the skin which in turn helps them cool off. Read more →


In the age of cyber sophistication, scammers and others can wreak havoc with our lives if we even momentarily let down our guard. For older adults who may not be technologically savvy, the threat is even greater. For them, like for someone speaking a second language, red flags might go unnoticed. People living with dementia may be at even more risk because of changes in the brain that can cause confusion. Here are tips for us all, including people living with dementia. Read more →


DICE is an acronym for Describe, Investigate, Evaluate, and Create: The DICE program recommends that caregivers - both professional and family - treat each person with dementia as an individual and also be aware that as symptoms change, approaches by caregivers should also change. DICE is a partnership between the physician, the patient, and the caregiver. Read more →


...Don’t let a bias against alternative medicine put you off. While we now have the blessing of the NIH to use rosemary, lemon, lavender, and orange by the inhaled method to help calm Alzheimer’s symptoms, we can also seek advice from trained professionals who may help us make the most of any number of ancient practices for ourselves and our loved ones. Read more →


People living with dementia are anxious to teach the public that while a dementia diagnosis is not what anyone wants to receive, it’s not as if they are "healthy" the day before the diagnosis and in late-stage dementia the day after. Many people live for years with manageable dementia, and any number of them would call their lives satisfying. Read more →


Immediately, you recognize that your nasty response is way out of proportion to your friend's comment. She's been there for you, even though when caregiving starts, friends often scatter.The person you are really angry at is your sister who repeatedly criticizes your caregiving ability. The problem is that words, once uttered, can't be withdrawn. Read more →


Dear Carol: I’ve been reading a lot about when if/when it’s time to force a parent into some kind of care. Your position seems to be that it’s the older adult’s decision unless there is dementia present. I can see that at 70, but my mom is 90. She’s mentally sharp and still likes her home and her garden but she refuses much help except for hiring lawn care, snow removal, and grocery delivery. She gave up driving on her own but she is adamant about not wanting to move to assisted living. At what age do adult children finally say enough and use our Power of Attorney to force a move? BT Read more →