Depression Feed

Alzheimer’s disease progresses differently for each person, scientists and clinicians have attempted to stage the disease as a way that helps people living with Alzheimer’s and their families understand what is happening, as well as to plan for the future. Some divide AD into seven stages, some five stages, but currently, three stages is the format most often used. The Alzheimer's Association uses three stages, so that is what we will use for our foundation here. Read more →

Validation is a term often used to describe different approaches to helping improve the quality of life of people living with Alzheimer’s disease and other types of dementia. Webster defines the word as “recognition or affirmation that a person or their feelings or opinions are valid or worthwhile.”  Read more →

Dear Carol: My husband and I cared for my mom in our home for several years before she passed away two months ago. The first two weeks I was nearly paralyzed with grief. After that, like someone flipped a switch, I went into a wild cleaning and tossing out spree. I just had to do something. Now, I’ve sunk into a low that’s hard to explain. I don’t want to get out of bed, shower, or even talk to anyone. I’ve been taking antidepressants for years, and have done well on them. I don’t think that my depression is making my depression worse since I know what that feels like, but I will see my doctor next month. Do you hear of these things with others?– ER Read more →

Surgery presents a greater risk as people age than the same surgery would have presented when this person was younger. Older people often have less robust immune systems so they are more at risk for general infections and they are more at risk for pneumonia. However, one of the most frightening risks for older people is post-surgical delirium. Read more →

The issues that are probably most often covered up are alcohol or drug abuse, but not far behind would be cognitive problems. It’s been known for some time that dementia has overtaken cancer as the most feared disease. It’s also well known that there’s no cure for dementia at this time. Additionally, even people with healthy brains who make an occasional wrong decision have a tendency to cover up. Read more →

Eight out of 10 older adults take at least one medication and many take three or more daily. Older adults comprise 13 percent of the population but account for 34 percent of all prescription medicine use and 30 percent of all over-the-counter medication use. Also, older adults often use multiple medicines (averaging 14 prescriptions each), increasing the risk of drug interactions, mix-ups, and the potential for harmful side effects. Read more →

Memory loss can be one of the first symptoms a person experiences with Alzheimer’s, and those living with Lewy body dementia may also become easily confused. These varied symptoms can make maintaining relationships more difficult, but friendships are no less important for people with dementia than for the rest of us. Maintaining relationships, however, especially among friends who are not pressured to continue involvement because of a new sense of duty over a person with dementia, can take work. This guide discusses how caregivers can help by educating willing visitors who want to be helpful but simply don’t know how to make a visit tolerable, let alone, meaningful. Read more →

It’s thought that sundowning stems from a combination of factors such as disorientation due to lack of light, fatigue, and disruptions in the body clock. While there’s no cure for sundowning some medications and lifestyle changes can help. Below are some tips that may help you and your loved one cope with this often frustrating end-of-day behavior: Read more →

Video: Molly Wisniewski of Upside To Aging Interviews Carol Bradley Bursack

From Molly Wisniewski of Upside To Aging: This week I sat down with author, writer, blogger, and consultant on aging... Read more →

Forgiveness, or the lack there of, can loom large in the life of a caregiver. Forgiving doesn’t mean forgetting. That is rule number one for people to remember when they are working toward crafting better relationships with family members and others whom they care about. Forgiveness can have enormous benefits for the health of the person who does the forgiving. Considering that negative thinking can be disastrous to your own health, you may want to work toward the positive habit of forgiveness. Here are some people that you may need to forgive along with reasons why you should. Read more →