Diabetes Feed

Negative Thinking: Could Your Life Have Been Happier?

... Brain9Hospice has found that many people wish at the end of life that they had allowed themselves to be happier. Happy doesn’t necessarily mean we are happy with every circumstance. It simply means accepting where we are in life and making the best of it. 

Read more on HealthCentral about the effects of negative thinking on our health:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer

Global Alzheimer’s Study Now Enrolling


Stop Eye Damage: Download NEHEP Tip Sheet for Diabetic Eye Care

OlderAdultEyesThe National Eye Health Education Program (NEHEP) is offering informative tip sheets for people with diabetes that may help them keep their sight. These tip sheets focus on different needs for different ethnic groups. Read below and download (you can cut and paste the link) for the tip sheet that works for you.  - Carol

Diabetes has become an epidemic in the United States. In the past 30 years, diagnosed cases of diabetes have increased more than 30 percent. If diabetes is not managed, it can lead to serious complications, including vision loss and blindness. In fact, diabetes is the leading cause of new cases of blindness among adults ages 20 to 74 years old.

All people with diabetes are at risk of losing vision from diabetic eye disease. However, 95 percent of severe vision loss can be prevented through early detection, timely treatment, and appropriate follow-up.

The National Eye Health Education Program (NEHEP), of the National Eye Institute (NEI), recently launched a tip sheets series, which includes ideas to engage African Americans, American Indians/Alaska Natives, Hispanics/Latinos, and older adults in learning more about diabetic eye disease.

Each tip sheet contains information on diabetic retinopathy as well as suggested educational resources that can be used to educate people about how to protect their vision by having a comprehensive dilated eye exam at least once a year and keeping their health on TRACK. That means: Take your medications as prescribed by your doctor; Reach and maintain a healthy weight; Add more physical activity to your daily routine; Control your ABC’s—A1C, blood pressure, and cholesterol levels; and Kick the smoking habit.

To download the tip sheet series and find other diabetic eye disease resources from NEHEP visit

www.nei.nih.gov/nehep/programs/diabeticeyedisease/educational


Are You Helping or Enabling Your Loved One?

HelpingHand4I watched my mom struggle with painful arthritis in every joint. She'd had two hip replacements and her knees rubbed bone against bone with every step. Sometimes, watching her struggle with her walker tore at my heart so much, I could hardly help but insist that she let me get her into the wheelchair. Yet, we both knew that if she didn't move she'd get worse.

Continue reading on Agingcare about the difference between helping and enabling:

Support a caregiver or jump start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders e-mail Carol: 


Exercise May Help Prevent Alzheimer’s: Study Shows Why

Exercise2The hippocampus, which is the area of the brain damaged by Alzheimer’s disease, plays an important role in forming long-term memories as well as in spatial navigation. Now, new evidence shows that exercise helps keep the hippocampus healthy. 

Read more on HealthCentral about how exercise may help prevent certain types of dementia:

Support a caregiver or jump start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders e-mail Carol: 


9 Tips to Manage Stress for Better Health

StressIncreasingly, stress is considered a risk factor for dementia, particularly Alzheimer’s. Stress is also a risk factor for stroke and heart attack as well as a trigger for many diseases from arthritis to psoriasis. Obviously, limiting stress in our lives is a good idea. But how? Simply living what we call modern life seems to make stress the norm.

View slide show on HealthCentral about managing stress:

Support a caregiver or jump start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders e-mail Carol


Advice on Possibly Preventing Alzheimer’s not Faulting Those With the Disease

Fruits_of_the_forest_blackberries_blueberries_223865

Dear Carol: Both of my parents had Alzheimer’s and have since died. I continually read advice on avoiding Alzheimer’s with diet, exercise and other lifestyle changes and I find this insulting. It seems to imply that people like my parents caused their own disease. We all know that Alzheimer’s can’t be cured and probably can’t be avoided. If we’re going to get it we’re going to get it. By telling people that if they use their brains more, eat blueberries or take care of their hearts they won’t get Alzheimer’s just increases the stigma.  - Steve

Read more on inforum about how information on lifestyle can help:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer


Optimal Diet for Alzheimer's Prevention?

BerriesHCPart of a healthy lifestyle, one that may prevent heart disease, Alzheimer’s and other diseases, involves consuming a nourishing diet. According to a recent study, one way to obtain these nutrients is through the MIND diet. This berry-heavy diet, which was created by nutritional epidemiologist Martha Clare Morris, PhD and colleagues at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, IL, is a tweaked combination of the Mediterranean and the DASH diets. The acronym MIND stands for Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay.  

Read more on HealthCentral about the MIND diet:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer


Heart and Brain Health Closely Related

BerriesHCFor years the Alzheimer's Association has made good use of the catch phrase "what's good for the heart is good for the brain." As additional research is conducted in both areas, that simple phrase is proving to be solid thinking. The startling admission of notable researchers who attended the 2014 Alzheimer's Association International Conference in Copenhagen that a healthy lifestyle is, at this point, the best hope we have to prevent or delay Alzheimer’s symptoms underscores this concept .

Read more on HealthCentral about heart and brain health:

Find local resources for walk-in tubs:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer


Folic Acid May Aid Elders During Heat Waves

FanHeatsmallerThe type of heat exhaustion or mild dehydration that a middle aged caregiver may feel during a heat wave is uncomfortable, but the same occurrence could be deadly for an elder. Because of the seriousness of overheating, some older people take a prescription drug that helps increase blood flow to the skin which in turn helps them cool off. 

Read more on HealthCentral about heat and the elderly:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer


How To Get People With Dementia To Take Medication

Medical_tablets_03_hd_pictures_168380As Alzheimer’s spreads throughout the brain, logic departs. The ability to understand one’s world disappears, understandably being replaced by fear and suspicion. These emotions are often blamed by caregivers when the person that they love refuses to take needed medications. 

Read more on HealthCentral about getting our elderly loved ones to take medication:

Find local resources for walk-in tubs:

Support a caregiver or jump start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders e-mail Carol: