Exercise Feed

Accepting Risks with Aging Parents Preserves Dignity

BicycleRisk...I know only too well that watching our parents get older is difficult. Ideally, they were once our anchors. No matter how difficult life became, there was comfort in knowing that our parents were around, even if they were half way across the country. Now, when we see their joints needing replacement, their skin wrinkling, perhaps even their memory recall slowing, we cringe. Whether or not we wish to admit it, we are afraid. We know that our parents are not immortal. One day we will be without them.Acknowledging our parents’ vulnerability is painful for us, and we want to protect them. This is a noble aspiration, but we need to move carefully and respectfully, always remembering that living life well often involves taking a few risks.

Read more on Agingcare about when to back off and let our elders live their lives:

Global Alzheimer’s Study Now Enrolling

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“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer


Negative Thinking Is Risky for Health

Brain4Most of us know that positive thinking is supposed to enhance our lives but thinking positively, especially for some personalities, can be easier said than done. Life can be hard. If you have dementia or another terminal illness, or if you provide care for someone who does, thinking positively can seem impossible. Yet, many studies have shown that negative thinking can cause havoc with our health.

Read more on HealthCentral about the effects of negative thinking on our health:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer

Global Alzheimer’s Study Now Enrolling


Reversing Memory Loss Without Drugs

RunningWoodsWe frequently hear about some promising new potential drug breakthrough, yet there is at this time no medical cure and it’s not likely that there will be one anytime soon. Thus, the interest in exercise, diet, vitamin and herbal remedies and brain challenges. 

Read more on HealthCentral about reversing memory loss without drugs

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook 

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer


Dental Care May Be Important Element In Avoiding Alzheimer’s

DentalCareAs people age, even the healthiest among us tend to need more maintenance. While young people can skip sleep and still function well, older people may need more rest to regain their energy. While young people may seem to thrive on junk food and sporadic exercise, older people may find that their bodies are more demanding about receiving their required nutrients and exercise if they are to stay vital. Increasingly, oral health is making news in this area.

Read more on Healthcentral about oral health and improving our Alzheimer's risk:

Support a caregiver or jump start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders of Minding Our Elders e-mail Carol


Long-term Caregivers Can Feel Lost When Caregiving Ends

OverwhelmedDear Carol: I’ve spent the last seven years caring for my mother who was a cancer survivor with many other health issues, as well as my father who had dementia. Both are now gone and I truly miss them. Not only am I sad, but I’m surprised at how lost I feel. I guess I’ve identified as a caregiver for so long I don’t know how to do anything else. I’m divorced and retired. My friends and I didn’t have much in common during my caregiving so we drifted apart. Now, I’m sitting empty handed and almost empty hearted. How do I start rebuilding my life? Amanda

Read more on Inforum about rebuilding your life after caregiving:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer


Challenging Hobbies Help Maintain Brain Health

PoolAlthough there’s a long way to go before Alzheimer’s and other types of dementia are well understood, studies have shown that keeping the body and brain active throughout life may offer some protection. Happily, it’s not all work. Hobbies can be healthy.

View slideshow on HealthCentral about how hobbies can benefit our brains:

Support a caregiver or jump start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders e-mail Carol

 


Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Is Painful but Treatable Condition

Arthritis...Kathryn Merrow, who is known as The Pain Relief Coach, agreed to tell us more about carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and how it can be treated without resorting to surgery. Kathryn’s done well over 25,000 sessions as a Neuromuscular  assage Therapist and has had significant advanced training. She has personally overcome migraines and scoliosis, along with other assorted injuries and pains, so she has firsthand experience with natural healing.

Read more on Agingcare about carpal tunnel syndrome and how you can treat it:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer


Advice on Possibly Preventing Alzheimer’s not Faulting Those With the Disease

Fruits_of_the_forest_blackberries_blueberries_223865

Dear Carol: Both of my parents had Alzheimer’s and have since died. I continually read advice on avoiding Alzheimer’s with diet, exercise and other lifestyle changes and I find this insulting. It seems to imply that people like my parents caused their own disease. We all know that Alzheimer’s can’t be cured and probably can’t be avoided. If we’re going to get it we’re going to get it. By telling people that if they use their brains more, eat blueberries or take care of their hearts they won’t get Alzheimer’s just increases the stigma.  - Steve

Read more on inforum about how information on lifestyle can help:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer


Optimal Diet for Alzheimer's Prevention?

BerriesHCPart of a healthy lifestyle, one that may prevent heart disease, Alzheimer’s and other diseases, involves consuming a nourishing diet. According to a recent study, one way to obtain these nutrients is through the MIND diet. This berry-heavy diet, which was created by nutritional epidemiologist Martha Clare Morris, PhD and colleagues at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, IL, is a tweaked combination of the Mediterranean and the DASH diets. The acronym MIND stands for Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay.  

Read more on HealthCentral about the MIND diet:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer


What are Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) and Why Do They Matter?

WomencaregivingTo help us understand ADLs, I asked Carmel Froemke for some clarification. Carmel has spent 25 years providing direct care and program management for individuals with disabilities, specializing in mental health rehabilitation. She’s now very close to obtaining her credentials as a Geriatric Care Manager. Below, Carmel answers our questions regarding activities of daily living:

Continue reading on Agingcare about Activities of Daily Living:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer