Eye health Feed

Hearing Aids Help Balance, Prevent Falls for Some Elders

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), falls are the leading cause of both fatal and nonfatal injuries for people over 65. Falls can cause moderate to severe injuries, such as hip fractures and head traumas, and can increase the risk of early death. Fortunately, falls are a public health problem that is largely preventable. The CDC suggests these steps as a start:

Read more on HealthCentral about how hearling loss can affect balance:

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Can Fish Oil Preserve Brain Function and Improve Memory?

Newer studies are discovering that the role of fish oil in our diets is broader than once thought. The Omega-3 fatty acids naturally found in fatty fish but often taken in capsule form have long been considered of major importance for heart health. Lately, scientists have discovered that these Omega-3s are of great benefit to our brains, as well, especially as we age.

Read more on HealthCentral about fish oil and brain function:

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Aging Eyes May Play a Role in Several Diseases

A recent story in the New York Times reports on new information suggesting that many problems we face as we age, including memory loss, insomnia, depression – even cancer – could be caused by changes in our eyes. Many of us become aware of vision changes in our early to mid-40s, when we find, as my mother used to say, that “the print in the newspaper keeps getting smaller.” What’s happening, of course, is presbyopia. As the eye ages, the lens of the eye gradually loses its ability to focus on close objects, thus the prevalence of reading glasses in our mid-years.

Read more on HealthCentral about aging eyes and disease:

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Eye Exam to Diagnose Alzheimer’s Early Promising

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Scientists and doctors and increasingly encourage people to get tested early for Alzheimer’s disease should they have a reason to think they are at risk. Since there is no cure for the disease, many people understandably wonder what the advantage of early diagnosis may be. Considering that testing is often invasive and expensive, such as those tests developed using spinal fluid, there is a reason to be skeptical. Now, however, newly developed methods used during eye exams that can identify very early Alzheimer’s disease offer a risk free, cost effective method of early detection.

Read more about how new eye exams may become the trend in Alzheimer's diagnosis:

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Related articles


Ears, Eye and Dental Health Checkups Difficult with Dementia

...You are helped into a chair and the doctor covers one of your eyes and asks what letters you see. What is a letter, you think, and why is he covering my face? You start to squirm and then push him away. You get more confused and frightened because you don't know what they want with you.

Read more about having ear, eye and teeth checks for elders with dementia:

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Cataract Surgery Improves Mood, Cognition in People with Dementia

After reading a report – the first of its kind – on how cataract surgery can benefit people with Alzheimer’s disease, I wrestled with some personal, if unfounded, guilt. My dad didn’t have AD, but he did have dementia induced by a failed brain surgery.

Before his surgery, Dad’s sight was poor at best. The fact that he also had cataracts was known, but after the brain surgery threw him into severe dementia, his cataracts became a minor problem. Or so the doctors thought.

Read more about how cataract surgery can help people with dementia:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook