Grandparents Feed

Reminiscing Powerful “Drug” for people with Dementia

SpousesI love stories. When I was a teenager, I’d encourage my grandparents to relate stories of their young years struggling to survive on the wind-swept prairie. When I grew older, I was fascinated by the stories my parents and in-laws told of their early years of growing up during the Great Depression. Little did I know at the time that peoples’ stories would become the springboard for my life’s work. Now there is mounting evidence that encouraging our elders to reminisce about their past is therapeutic as well as enjoyable. 

Read more on HealthCentral about reminiscing as treatment for AD symptoms:

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“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer


9 Tips for Visiting Elders At Home or In a Facility

VisitingwomanLoneliness can be a plague for the elderly and ill. Yet visiting with someone who doesn’t feel well, and may have limited cognition, can be tricky. Some nervousness or reluctance is natural, but a few considerations can help to make the visit go smoothly.

View slide show on HealthCentral about visiting:

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Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer


Helping Kids Cope with Alzheimer's in Grandparents

LonelygirlOur family's introduction to dementia was different than the typical case. Most people with dementia will decline slowly, giving loved ones time to adjust. However, no time frame makes accepting dementia easy.

Read more on Agingcare about how to help kids cope with Alzheimer's:

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Support a caregiver or jump start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders e-mail Carol: 


Increasingly Adult Grandchildren Becoming Primary Caregivers

FenceIt may surprise people to know that there are a significant number of young people barely out of their teens who have become caregivers for their grandparents. Many of these young people were raised by their grandparents. In other instances, the grandchild becomes the primary caregiver because he or she lives closer to the elder than other family members. Sometimes, it's simply because a particular grandchild feels close to the grandparent and has the "caregiver personality."

Read more on Agingcare about adult grandchildren becoming caregivers:

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Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer


Intergenerational Living: Should You Build Addition for Parents or In-laws?

...with our current tendency to follow trends and label them, sociologists would call what my family did decades ago "intergenerational living," and Grandma's special living area would be considered an "in-law suite." In this era of supersizing, some intergenerational living arrangements even involve detached smaller homes on the same lot as the family abode.

Read more about the pros and cons of Granny Flats or In-law suites:

Find local resources for walk-in tubs:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer


Elders Covering for Each Other Can Hide Dementia Symptoms

Long married couples are often said to “finish each other’s sentences.” They work as a unit, and friends and family members are used to this interaction. This ability to work as a team is a wonderful thing until one of the team isn’t functioning well and the other is in denial. When couples cover up for each other, precious time can be lost. So, adult children need to be on the lookout for signs that things aren’t going well.

Read more on HealthCentral about Elders Covering for Each Other Can Hide Dementia Symptoms:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer


Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff: Bloopers Can Add to Family Christmas Stories

No matter how well we plan, most of us have some loose ends to tie up Christmas Eve day, just before going to church or having the family gather at our home. The present that was ordered early and then delayed remains in question. Will it arrive in time? The fruit tray reserved at the grocery store? Will it be there when we arrive to pick it up?

Read more on HealthCentral about Holiday bloopers that we should just let go:

Support a caregiver or jump start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders e-mail Carol:  


It’s Christmas Day: Are You Enjoying It?

Merry Christmas to all of my wonderful readers! I can't say Merry Christmas to caregivers any better than I did in 2010, so I'm linking back to that article. It is, afterall, Christmas.

Many people are celebrating Christmas Day, today, December 25th. Caregivers may find the word "celebrating" a little over the top, but try not to be too dismissive.   If you are caring for a parent or spouse who doesn't recognize you for who you are, that doesn't mean your efforts are unappreciated. Know that on some level, your love is understood. Celebrate that. 

Read more on HealthCentral about Christmas Day as a caregiver:

Support a caregiver or jump start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders e-mail Carol: 


Christmas Is Here: Our Best Is Good Enough

The decisions caregivers of elderly loved ones must make during the Christmas holidays are fraught with opportunities to make mistakes in judgment. Chief among them is how much to include a loved one who has dementia in the festivities.   Will the Christmas tree bring Mom happy memories of past Christmas pleasures or will it remind her of the Christmas tree fire in her home when she was a five year old child?

Read more on HealthCentral about accepting that our decisons are made and we did our best:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer 


10 Ways to Ward Off Holiday Blues

Many of us don't feel merry or happy during this time of celebration. Caregivers, especially, may be even less likely than others to be looking forward to all of the hoopla associated with the expected happy holidays. Some of us dread even thinking about it. How do we beat this feeling of holiday blues so that we can get through the next couple of weeks?

Read more on Agingcare about 10 ways to beat the holiday blues:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer