In-home care Feed

Contest: National Caregiver Relief Giveaway - Lift Chair Top Prize

ContestWhen Tony Rovere was caring for his mother he felt lost when it came to finding resources for caregivers. Because of his experience, Tony eventually founded Stuff Seniors Need at www.stuffseniorsneed.com.  The site is a terrific place to go if you want to find good cell phone plans for seniors, information about hearing aids or dentures, and information on most other products and services.

Now, Tony is launching the National Caregiver Relief Giveaway to assist caregivers throughout the United States. The top prize is a multi-position lift chair. It is free to enter. You can find out more details at caregiverhappiness.com/home. There are other prizes as well, and it's free to enter. Check out Tony's website and also go to the caregiver happiness site and register for prizes. You'll have found another wonderful resource. 

Just so you know, I don't have any connection to this site or it's products - I'm just a fan.

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer


5 Tips to Ease Discussions with Elders about Housing

FatherDaugher6As you watch your parents or other beloved elders age, you worry. Should they have housing upgrades? Can they continue to live independently? Your intention isn’t to take over their lives but you genuinely want to start the conversation about possible future changes. How do you do this without causing a backlash?

View slide show on HealthCentral about tips for discussing housing arrangements with elders:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer

Global Alzheimer’s Study Now Enrolling


Option of Hospice Care Helps Many Let Go

BridgeToCloudPeople who read my work on a regular basis know that I am grateful to hospice for the care of both of my parents. Without the skilled, compassionate care of the hospice staff, both of my parents would have suffered far more than they did. As it was, they’d both had long, slow declines. Pain had become the focus of their lives even though they received excellent care in the nursing home. First Dad, and eventually Mom, qualified for hospice care because they were considered terminally ill with less than six months to live. I filled out the paperwork for each of them and, yes, doing so was painful for me. But not having hospice there to take care of their end-of-life needs was unthinkable. 

Read more on HealthCentral about the option of hospice care and how it affects people:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer

Global Alzheimer’s Study Now Enrolling


Getting Over the Guilt of Placing a Loved One in a Home

AnxietyFor many caregivers, placing an elder in a home spells failure on the part of the caregiver. Even when carers know they've done all they can, a subconscious nagging voice often tells them they are giving up on their parents or spouse. I'm here to tell you that you are not giving up. You are just getting help. 

Read more on HealhtCentral about getting over the guilt of placing a loved one in a home:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer

Global Alzheimer’s Study Now Enrolling


Dementia Service Dogs an Idea That Needs Support

DogServiceMost of us are aware of service dogs, especially guide dogs for people with sight impairment, because we see them around our communities. These dogs are not pets. They are working animals and are allowed wherever the person they serve goes. Increasingly, other service dogs are being trained to help people with impaired hearing, people who have grand mal seizures and people with Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome. With more than five million people in the U.S. alone coping with the effects of Alzheimer’s, any attempt to help people with dementia have a better quality of life is welcome. So why not have trained service dogs for people with dementia?

Read more on HealthCentral about service dogs for people with Alzheimer's:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer

Global Alzheimer’s Study Now Enrolling


What Can You Expect From an In-Home Caregiver?

FatherDaughterDear Carol: I’ve hired an in-home care agency to have a caregiver spend six hours a day with my mother. Mom doesn’t need a lot of care except for bathing, occasional bathroom issues, supervision for her meals and pills and some companionship. The caregiver will take Mom out shopping, as well, but this still leaves a lot of time for the hired caregiver to just sit around and talk with Mom, or read if Mom is napping. Is it asking too much that the caregiver would straighten up the house, do some dishes or even some laundry while she is there? This help is costly, so I’m wondering if I’m getting my money’s worth.  Virginia

Read more on Inforum about how to determine the duties of a paid caregiver:

Global Alzheimer’s Study Now Enrolling

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer


How to Choose a Mobility Aid: Advice from an Expert

WomencaregivingWhen I see some of the newer mobility aids now in in use, I immediately think, “I wish that had been available for my mom.” My mother was happy enough to have what was available at the time, but her options then were a basic cane and later, a stripped-down walker which I did my best to modify so that she could carry things with her. Fortunately, there are many more choices on the market now.

Read more on Agingcare about mobility aids and how to choose them:

Support a caregiving friend at Christmas with a gift of Minding Our Elders

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer


Caregiver of Elder Requires Caregiver of Her Own

LilypadDear Carol: I’m a single woman who was forced into early retirement because of multiple sclerosis. My mother has been a widow for years and I’m her only living child so we’re very close. She recently had two strokes and has residual issues so I had her move in with me. We get along well, but I’m finding that I can’t take care of her needs without worsening my own health. We’ve been looking at different options for care and Mom is fine with whatever we need to do. I know that I'm being irrational, but I feel guilty that I can’t take care of her by myself. Where do I start to make changes? M.L.B.

Continue reading on Inforum about graduated living options:

Find local resources for walk-in tubs:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer


Respect Diverse Approaches to Caregiving

As a caregiver for multiple elders – at one time I was providing some type of care to five elders in three locations, as well as caring for my children – I've received my share of criticism. There were those who felt that I should have provided for my elders in my home. Of course, these weren't people who knew my family's full situation. They were casual onlookers. Sidewalk superintendents, if you will. 

Read more on Agingcare about respecting other's approaches to caregiving:

Support a caregiver or jump start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders e-mail Carol: 

Find local resources for walk-in tubs:


"I Want To Go Home" - A Search for Comfort?

Most of us who've cared for people with dementia have heard the sad, repetitive lament, "I want to go home." If the person lives in a nursing home or assisted living facility, relatives naturally think that the home the elder wants to return to is the last place he or she lived before going to the care home.

Read more on Agingcare about parents who want to "go home"

Support a caregiver or jump start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders e-mail Carol: 

Find local resources for walk-in tubs: