Medication Feed

Dear Carol: My husband and I cared for my mom in our home for several years before she passed away two months ago. The first two weeks I was nearly paralyzed with grief. After that, like someone flipped a switch, I went into a wild cleaning and tossing out spree. I just had to do something. Now, I’ve sunk into a low that’s hard to explain. I don’t want to get out of bed, shower, or even talk to anyone. I’ve been taking antidepressants for years, and have done well on them. I don’t think that my depression is making my depression worse since I know what that feels like, but I will see my doctor next month. Do you hear of these things with others?– ER Read more →

Emergencies come with caregiving. Whether an emergency means accompanying a loved one to the ER or making a trip to the person’s home or nursing home, the more information we have at our fingertips the better.  Read more →

Eight out of 10 older adults take at least one medication and many take three or more daily. Older adults comprise 13 percent of the population but account for 34 percent of all prescription medicine use and 30 percent of all over-the-counter medication use. Also, older adults often use multiple medicines (averaging 14 prescriptions each), increasing the risk of drug interactions, mix-ups, and the potential for harmful side effects. Read more →

...One reason for this intense fear of Alzheimer’s is obvious. While many types of cancer can be cured, most types of dementia cannot. However, another reason is that the idea of being betrayed by our brains to the point that we are essentially lost in the disease is abhorrent to most of us. Read more →

Increasingly, studies are showing that hearing loss is not simply an inconvenient part of the aging process. Hearing loss can have serious effects on the aging brain health. As with many health issues, early intervention may be able to prevent damage as well as ease frustration. Read more →

...Insulin resistance, which is a hallmark of type 2 diabetes, was shown in tests to influence verbal fluency in women more than men. Verbal fluency is one of many skills tested when looking for symptoms of cognitive issues that often lead to Alzheimer’s disease. According to the study’s authors, it is common to test verbal fluency when evaluating different executive functions and semantic memory, as well. Read more →

For many of us, a car is a sign of independence. But this emotional connection to our automobiles is part of what makes convincing a person that he or she is no longer capable of driving such a volatile battle. The longer adult children or others wait to discuss driving issues with a loved one, the harder it can be. Read more →

Dear Carol: My mother has mid-stage dementia, as a mixture of Alzheimer’s and vascular. Dad is taking care of her, and overall it’s going okay as long as I go over to their apartment each day to help with baths, run errands, and accompany them to medical appointments. What’s troubling is that last week Mom fell against a cupboard corner and tore a gash in her shoulder. Read more →

If the risk of a stroke or heart attack doesn’t scare us into controlling our blood pressure, surely a heightened risk for vascular dementia should. While Alzheimer’s is consented by experts as the most common form of dementia, vascular dementia follows closely behind in ranking. The two mixed together are also common, so we should consider ourselves at risk for dementia unless we have a healthy vascular system. Read more →

"What’s the difference between being a patient and being a 'person? Often, “patient” means you’re suffering. Something is wrong with you. Ideally, you would never be treated like this in your own home. As you try to do your best to manage the situation, you deserve respect over constant nagging." Read more →