Medication Feed

As with most types of dementia, family members are the primary caregivers by default, at least at the beginning of the disease. They are usually the people who notice that something is not right with their spouse or parent. Again, like Alzheimer’s and most other types of dementia, care needs escalate with time. This ongoing care can be physically arduous and emotionally demanding. Read more →


The type of heat exhaustion or mild dehydration that a middle-aged caregiver may feel during a heat wave is uncomfortable, but the same occurrence could be deadly for an elder. Because of the seriousness of overheating, some older people take a prescription drug that helps increase blood flow to the skin which in turn helps them cool off. Read more →


Caregiving is a continual learning process and no two situations are identical. But, becoming as organized as possible and consistently trying to stay that way can help us relieve stress and use our time more efficiently. It might seem overwhelming to maintain order in such a hectic situation, but a reasonably small amount of effort applied regularly will prove to be far easier than frantically trying to handle everyday mishaps and especially larger emergencies. Read more →


Dear Carol: My dad is 86 and quite healthy other than his eyes. Recently, he developed the wet form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and needs to get regular injections in his eyes to slow the leaking of the blood vessels. Dad tolerates the treatment well, so I’ve been taking him to the clinic for this but my sister is having a fit. Read more →


People living with dementia are anxious to teach the public that while a dementia diagnosis is not what anyone wants to receive, it’s not as if they are "healthy" the day before the diagnosis and in late-stage dementia the day after. Many people live for years with manageable dementia, and any number of them would call their lives satisfying. Read more →


Rather than a drug or treatment, MEND is a protocol where patients made dramatic lifestyle changes. According to the ABC report, “They avoided simple carbs, gluten, and processed foods. They increased their fish intake, took yoga and meditated. They were instructed to take melatonin, get adequate sleep, incorporate vitamin B-12, vitamin D-3 and fish oil.” Read more →


Increasingly, Alzheimer’s specialists and researchers stress the importance of early detection. In fact, most drugs now considered as possible methods for holding off Alzheimer’s symptoms seem to be dependent on starting the drug early – as much as a decade earlier than symptoms appear. The question that travels hand in hand with these studies is who should start these drugs if they do prove to be effective? It’s not prudent to simply give the drugs to the whole aging population. Read more →


According to the Alzheimer's Association, the brain changes caused by Parkinson’s disease begin in a region that plays a key role in movement. As the brain changes gradually spread, they often begin to affect mental functions as well as physical functions. These changes can include memory and the ability to pay attention, the ability to make sound judgments and the ability to plan the steps needed to complete a task. Read more →


When dementia symptoms appear it’s natural to fear that the person affected has an incurable form of dementia. Rather than reacting with panic, however, it’s far better to try to remain calm and have a specialist make the determination. Many forms of dementia are incurable, of course, but other conditions can present symptoms that resemble those of dementia but are in fact reversible. Read more →


Acute inflammation is the body’s natural response to tissue damage. Its purpose is to defend the body against harmful substances, dispose of dead or dying tissue and to promote the renewal of normal tissue. Therefore, inflammation is normal if we are ill from a virus or bacterial infection or we injure ourselves.  Read more →