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5 Examples of How Forgiveness Can Improve a Caregiver's Life

Hands6Forgiveness, or the lack there of, can loom large in the life of a caregiver. Forgiving doesn’t mean forgetting. That is rule number one for people to remember when they are working toward crafting better relationships with family members and others whom they care about. Forgiveness can have enormous benefits for the health of the person who does the forgiving.  Considering that negative thinking can be disastrous to your own health, you may want to work toward the positive habit of forgiveness. Here are some people that you may need to forgive and some reasons why you should.

Read more on HealthCentral about the benefits of forgiveness:

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“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer

Global Alzheimer’s Study Now Enrolling


When Life Falls Apart Try Gratitude

Reflections5I’ve lived a number of decades and had my share of pain, yet I don’t know that any pain cuts more deeply than knowing that someone I love is hurting. Unfortunately, as a family caregiver who over time helped provide care for multiple elders, that kind of soul searing pain is something I know well. Yet, I do my level best to find things to be grateful for even during those tough times. Why? Because, in the end, recognizing all that I have to be grateful for helps me cope. 

Read more on HealthCentral on finding gratitude in despair:

Global Alzheimer’s Study Now Enrolling

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer


Faith Helps Some Caregivers Relieve Stress According to Study

StormcloudAs a longtime family caregiver who provided, and continues to provide, differing levels of care for loved ones with illnesses, I can attest to the fact that caregiving can be unimaginably stressful. For dementia caregivers, the stress is even more extreme. Only lately have we seen the results of studies that have followed family caregivers. One of the most scientific, in that it uses hard physical evidence, was published last spring. The study, by Ohio State University in conjunction with the National Institute on Aging, showed that caregivers may have their life span shortened by four to eight years.

Read more on HealthCentral about how faith can help lower stress levels for some caregivers:

Global Alzheimer’s Study Now Enrolling

Support a caregiver or jump start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders of Minding Our Elders e-mail Carol

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Are You a Caregiver? Coping with Holiday Stress

Caregivers: Keeping Your Sanity During the Holidays

Snowflakes-background-10046398...That scenario sounds like a walk in the park to some modern caregivers, especially those known as the sandwich generation  because they are raising children while caring for their parents. At this time of the year, nearly every parent has one, if not several, school holiday programs to attend, plus church or other religious programs they want their children to participate in. Many have a full-time job, which often requires attendance at office functions outside of work hours, not to mention festivities during work time that pretty much require a big smile and a batch of home-made cookies. Is this your story?

Read the complete article on Agingcare about stay sane during the holidays:

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“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer


November Appropriate Month for Celebrating Hospice and Palliative Care

Comfort“I hope we don’t have another funeral this Christmas,” my young son said after we wrapped up Halloween. Hearing my child voice that fear nearly broke my heart, but our family had endured the deaths of two elders in a row during the Christmas season so why wouldn't he wonder if this year would be the same? Thankfully, that particular year, we didn’t have a funeral during the season, though we did the following year. So, when it comes to death during the holidays, I have had some experience. 

Read more on HealthCentral about National Hospice and Palliative Care Month

Support a caregiver or jump start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders of Minding Our Elders e-mail Carol


Self-help Methods of Coping with Caregiver Stress

LoneCoffeecupCaregiving can leave us with a kaleidoscope of emotions that is ever-changing and often tumultuous. Many of these emotions induce guilt. While therapy is recommended for people who are having a deep struggle with negative feelings they cannot lay to rest, often there are steps that we can take by ourselves to handle our feelings in a healthy manner.

Read more on Agingcare about self-help approaches to caregiver stress:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer


Faith and Alzheimer’s: How Do We Cope?

ChurchHow can faith help both caregivers and people with dementia get through something that makes no sense even to those who believe in a loving God – or maybe especially to those who believe in a loving God?   Many people have asked me this question. My own spiritual beliefs have been vital to my caregiving life, but I wanted to give people more depth than I could provide on my own. 

Read more on HealthCentral about faith and Alzheimer's disease:

Find local resources for walk-in tubs: 

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook 

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer 


New Year’s Resolutions: Are They Practical for Caregivers?

...This is a new year, which makes it a good time psychologically for an attitude adjustment on your part. Changing your attitude toward your caregiving responsibilities doesn't mean that you don't love the person you are caring for as much as ever. Changing your attitude may even be evidence, once you think about it, of the depth of your love.

Read more on Agingcare about how changing our attitude may give us a fesh look:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer


Faith and Alzheimer’s: Spiritual Connection Supports Many People with Dementia and Their Caregivers

How can faith help both caregivers and people with dementia get through something that makes no sense even to those who believe in a loving God – or maybe especially to those who believe in a loving God? Many people have asked me this question. My own spiritual beliefs have been vital to my caregiving life, but I wanted to give people more depth than I could provide on my own. With that in mind, I asked Dr. Benjamin Mast, a licensed clinical psychologist, Associate Professor in Psychology & Brain Sciences and Geriatric Medicine at the University of Louisville author and also author of "Second Forgetting: Remembering the Power of the Gospel during Alzheimer’s Disease," to give us some answers from his perspective. 

Read more on HealthCentral about Faith and Alzheimer's:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer


Stephen Ministers can help with grief support

Dear Carol: My mom has multiple sclerosis and Dad took care of her for years. Eventually, she had to go into a nursing home, but it was near their apartment and Dad remained a dedicated caregiver. Things went well until Dad died of a sudden heart attack. Since there was no one left for mom, and the three of us kids live in different towns, we decided to move mom to a very nice nursing home near me, the oldest daughter. Mom is so devastated by Dad’s death that she doesn’t care about anything, including the move. Her doctor here has her on an antidepressant which doesn’t seem to do much. She’s a very devoted Christian and just wants to “join” Dad. How can I help her live a better quality of life? - Freddie

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