Research Feed

Hearing Aids Help Balance, Prevent Falls for Some Elders

HearingaidAccording to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), falls are the leading cause of both fatal and nonfatal injuries for people over 65. Falls can cause moderate to severe injuries, such as hip fractures and head traumas, and can increase the risk of early death. Fortunately, falls are a public health problem that is largely preventable. The CDC suggests these steps as a start:

Read more on HealthCentral about how hearing aids can help people age well:

Christmas Gift for your Elders -  Peace of Mind for You:  Simple Smart Phone with Large Screen, Jitterbug flip phone, Urgent Response Device    For Help CALL:  1-866-222-0703

Support caregivers this CHRISTMAS by giving them copies  of Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories. ORDER EARLY before supplies run out.

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer

 


Reversing Alzheimer’s: Lifestyle Plan Shows Promise

MomDaughter10It’s been said that once you know one person with Alzheimer’s, you know one person with Alzheimer’s. In other words: people are unique, and not everyone will respond to a particular treatment. This truth was highlighted in a study based on the combined efforts of the Buck Institute for Research on Aging and UCLA Easton Laboratories for Neurodegenerative Disease Research.

Read full article on HealthCentral about possibly reversing Alzheimer's:

 

Christmas Gift for your Elders - Peace of Mind for You:  Simple Smart Phone with Large Screen, Jitterbug flip phone, Urgent Response Device   For help CALL:  1-866-222-0703

Support caregivers this CHRISTMAS by giving them copies  of Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories. ORDER EARLY before supplies run out.


Iron Levels May Dementia and Stroke Risk

Pills_190843It’s long been accepted that iron is a necessary nutrient for the body though the amount needed can change with an individual’s age as well as gender. Now, there is evidence that iron can also have conflicting effects depending on whether a person is at risk for stroke and vascular dementia or for Alzheimer’s disease.

Read full article on HealthCentral about the effect of excess iron on dementia and stroke risk:

Christmas Gift for your Elders -  Peace of Mind for You:  Simple Smart Phone with Large Screen, Jitterbug flip phone, Urgent Response Device    For Help CALL:  1-866-222-0703

Support caregivers this CHRISTMAS by giving them copies  of Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories. ORDER EARLY before supplies run out.

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Is it Alzheimer's, a Different Type of Dementia or Something Else Entirely?

Leaky Blood-Brain Barrier One More Step in Understanding Development of Alzheimer's

Depression in Elders: Symptoms, Triggers and What to Do

DepressionthkstkDepression in the elderly is not unusual, and can be brought on by any number of factors, ranging from physical issues or cognitive issues to life events. Spouses, adult children, and friends can take steps to help. These steps include:

View slide show in HealthCentral about depression in elders:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer

Global Alzheimer’s Study Now Enrolling


Long-term Testing May Speed Early Treatment of Alzheimer’s with Medication

OldermanTHinkStockScientists at the University of Edinburgh’s Centre for Cognitive and Neural Systems have found evidence that long-term testing starting well before any signs of Alzheimer’s symptoms  are evident could be a valuable tool in detecting which people will need intervention with therapeutic drugs that are now in clinical trials. This type of intervention could possibly halt or even reverse cognitive damage while the patient is still symptom-free. The long-term testing would be done in conjunction with brain scans.

                         Read more on HealthCentral about how this human based test can speed the diagnosis of AD:

                                 Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer

Global Alzheimer’s Study Now Enrolling


Leaky Blood-Brain Barrier One More Step in Understanding Development of Alzheimer's

Brain12The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a collection of cells and cellular components that line the walls of blood vessels in the brain. This barrier is an important part of brain health because it separates the brain from circulating blood. A study led by Walter H. Backes, Ph.D., a professor in medical physics at Maastricht University Medical Center in the Netherlands, has found that the blood-brain barrier was leakier in a group of people with Alzheimer's disease than in those without the disease.

Read more on HealthCentral about this human study and what the leaky blood-brain barrier means:

Support caregivers this Christmas by giving them copies  of Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories:


Overcoming Denial to Seek Potential Dementia Diagnosis

Brain10A recent article in the UK Telegraph reported on a survey showing that two thirds of people over the age of 50 are more afraid of developing dementia than of getting cancer. Other surveys show similar percentages. One reason for this intense fear of Alzheimer's is obvious. While many types of cancer can be cured, most types of dementia cannot. However, another reason is that the idea of being betrayed by our brains to the point that we are essentially lost in the disease is abhorrent to most of us.

Read more on HealthCentral about denial and Alzheimer's:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer

Global Alzheimer’s Study Now Enrolling


Younger Onset Alzheimer’s Disease (YOAD) Symptoms Surprisingly Different

AnxietyWhen we think of Alzheimer’s symptoms we think of memory loss, yet this is not necessarily the case with younger onset Alzheimer's. Younger onset Alzheimer’s may present symptoms such as poor judgement and skewed thinking patterns before memory loss becomes evident. Researchers at University College London (UCL) studied 7,815 people who have been diagnosed with Alzheimer's. The point of the study was to determine if symptoms differed according to age of onset.

Read more on HealthCentral about how YOAD may differ from older onset:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer

Global Alzheimer’s Study Now Enrolling


Dementia as a Disability: Mental Health Foundation (UK) Advocates for Inclusion

Brain5...For those with younger onset Alzheimer's disease (YOAD), the fact that brain disease would develop in someone who is not “old” makes the adjustment even harder. Many, in their 40s and 50s, are still raising children and are at the peaks of their careers. Younger onset Alzheimer’s, as well as other dementias that can strike people still in their prime, can be even more devastating than the traditionally developed dementia that presents symptoms in one’s older years. Considering that dementia at any age is devastating, it’s hard to place values on what is harder. However, the younger the person, the more years of normal life have been lost.

Read more on HealthCentral about how the UK is beginning to look at dementia:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer

Global Alzheimer’s Study Now Enrolling


Alzheimer’s Does Not Diminish Pain Sensitivity

DementiaManMany people with Alzheimer's disease have been administered less pain medication than peers with no dementia who suffer from similar painful diseases or injuries. Since people in the later stages of Alzheimer’s can’t communicate well other than by generally acting in an aggressive manner, they can’t self-report pain. Some professionals have, in the past, concluded that the neurodegeneration caused by the disease must lower the sensitivity to pain, so they administer less medication for pain relief.

Read more on HealthCentral about pain relief and dementia:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer

Global Alzheimer’s Study Now Enrolling