Seniors Feed

When Does Senior Forgetfulness Need Evaluation?

  OldercoupleDear Carol: My husband and I are both in our late seventies. There have been a few times when my husband has left the stove top burner on and sometimes he leaves water running after he leaves a room. Maybe it’s more because of distraction than forgetfulness, since I know that I’ve done similar things, but how do we tell? He seems to remember names and other details as well as anyone our age. When I mention my worries to my husband he gets defensive and reminds me of small things that I’ve forgotten. I’ve read the list of possible Alzheimer’s issues online, but that didn’t help much. How do older people decide if they need to be checked out for dementia?  Linda 

Read more on Inforum about older couple wondering about memory problems:

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“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer

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Depression and Dementia Challenging Combination to Manage

Medical_drugs_tablets_222894Dear Carol: My mother has had problems with mild depression all of her life but up until now she’s managed it without drugs. Mom’s now 81-years-old. A few months ago she was diagnosed with early stage dementia so her doctor put her on drugs for Alzheimer’s symptoms. After starting these drugs, Mom’s depression got worse so the same doctor prescribed an antidepressant. Now her depression is worse than ever, she’s confused, and she has nausea and digestive problems. Is this the normal course of events for someone like my mother? I’ve always liked this doctor and he’s cared for mom for years but I’m uncertain about the direction that this is going. FHM

Read full column on Inforum about dementia drugs and antidepressants for the elderly:

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Global Alzheimer’s Study Now Enrolling


Some Forms of Dementia Can Develop Quickly

AnxietyDear Carol: My mother, at 76, had been doing exceptionally well. Her health was good except for high blood pressure. Her mind was active and quick. That all changed after a series of small strokes. Her doctor has said that these small strokes are the cause of Mom’s mental changes which have been diagnosed as vascular dementia. She used to be so level headed but now she’s confused, disoriented and frightened. I thought dementia developed slowly and that people had time to plan. Now I feel completely blindsided. I’m told this will just worsen and that she can’t be cured. I feel that this suddenness is almost worse than watching the gradual development of dementia. How do I handle this and move forward? SCR

Read full article about vascular dementia on Inforum: 

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“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer

Global Alzheimer’s Study Now Enrolling


Give Your Dad the Best Father’s Day Gift Ever: Your Attention

CaregiverWheelchairAre you tired of listening to your elders repeat stories? Do you just chalk the repetition up to memory issues? If so, there are a lot of people who can relate. But here's something to think about. There may be a reason aside from memory issues that can explain the repetitive stories. As years go by, most of us gain – or attempt to gain – perspective. By retelling personal stories, elders are often, consciously or subconsciously, trying to re-frame their life from the perspective of time.

Read more on Agingcare about how your attention can be the best Father's Day ever:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer

Global Alzheimer’s Study Now Enrolling


Bed Sores: What Caregivers Need to Know

DeathBedsores, or pressure ulcers as the professionals generally call these injuries, are a serious concern for caregivers in long-term care settings, employees in hospitals and of course, to family caregivers. People who are bedridden or spend significant time in bed or a chair and cannot shift positions on their own can be at risk. While a small, irritated area of skin does not sound like a huge concern to the average person, this minor annoyance can quickly develop into a major health problem for a person who is vulnerable.

Read more on Agingcare about bed sores - pressure ulcers -  and how to prevent them:

Support a caregiver or jump start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders of Minding Our Elders e-mail Carol

Global Alzheimer’s Study Now Enrolling


3 Triggers for Alcohol Abuse in Elderly

ElderlyManCaneAlcohol abuse can occur at any age, but in the past most doctors looked for the signs in younger people. There’s also a bias in society at large, including some doctors, that people who abuse alcohol will be of a certain type. It can be hard for a doctor to look at a sweet, grandmotherly woman and think that perhaps the “occasional” glass of wine she admits to drinking may actually be a good portion of a bottle on nightly basis. But things are changing. Now, the NIH Senior Health site is promoting awareness of alcohol abuse among the senior population.   

Read more on HealthCentral about alcohol abuse and the elderly:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer

Global Alzheimer’s Study Now Enrolling


Restless Leg Syndrome: What It Is and How To Cope

Doctor...RLS can affect caregivers and/or their care receivers, both of whom can be short on sleep. Knowing that we had a need for a sympathetic medical ear, I asked Keith W. Roach, MD, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College, for the facts. I have been a fan of Dr. Roach’s work for a long time because he has what I consider to be a balanced approach to medical care and he projects an attitude of relatability and sympathy. Dr. Roach answered my questions by phone.

Read the full interview with Dr. Roach on Agingcare:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer

Global Alzheimer’s Study Now Enrolling


Moving Beyond Diagnosis toward Living with the Dementia

Caregiver6For most anyone who has been diagnosed with dementia, or has loved someone with a type of dementia, the formal diagnosis was a moment frozen in time. A moment where the thought of possibly having a brain destroying disease became a confirmed reality. That pivotal moment is life changing, however people can move beyond that moment in time and learn to live with dementia.

Read more on HealthCentral about living with dementia:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer

Global Alzheimer’s Study Now Enrolling


Alzheimer’s Risk Higher for Women: Why?

Caregiverstress3It’s been known for years that women are more at risk for Alzheimer’s disease than men. Now there’s even more evidence of gender differences. A new study has found that among those who've been diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), women show a much faster rate of memory loss than men.
 
 

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer

Global Alzheimer’s Study Now Enrolling


Dementia Boot Camp: Training to Be a Caregiver, Part 2

Brain7An aide pushed a wheelchair toward me, mentioning “the one in the black pants.” I was wearing black jeans.

“This one’s hospice?” she asked the woman who brought me in.

“Yeah,” she said. “I’ll put her in this chair,” the woman said. “No one who uses this chair lives long, anyway.”

Read Part 2 of Dementia Boot Camp on HealthCentral:

Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook

“I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.”  Craig William Dayton, Film Composer

Global Alzheimer’s Study Now Enrolling