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“What it means to me for Matt to have Alzheimer's and need my care is, it is the most heartbreaking journey to watch your spouse deteriorate and I'm helpless to stop it! I had a parent with Alzheimer's. Caring for a spouse is much different. No retirement years for Matt and me!” Read more →


Women can experience fecal incontinence after childbirth due to muscle and/or nerve damage that results from injury to the anal sphincter that holds back the stool. This is more common if either an episiotomy or forceps are used during the process of giving birth. Read more →


Burnout is a pervasive problem for family caregivers, especially those who have no time to get away from the ongoing emotional and physical demands of caring for an ailing family member. Your situation is a classic example: One adult child who is still living in the parents’ community... Read more →


Emergency-room doctor Kevin Haselhorst had an epiphany while he tried valiantly to save an elderly man who’d been through one-too-many traumas. His book, “Wishes To Die For: A Caregiver’s Guide to Advance Care Directives,” was the first step toward a new advocacy. Dr. Haselhorst continues to work toward helping people understand the importance of healthcare directives and the ability to make their own decisions about end-of-life care. Curious about more of Dr. Haselhorst’s views, the Candid Caregiver contacted him through email for the following interview. Read more →


People of all ages dread the idea of losing their independence, but many seniors are living this reality and struggling to come to terms with it. Aging is hardly a graceful process, so who can blame our elders for digging their heels in? Read more →


Dear SL: I’m so sorry! Your history points to a lot of misery with your mother. Her anger is misplaced, but her personality is unlikely to change so you’ll need to see what you can do to take care of yourself. Read more →


A brief time after Dad's death, Mom's own terminal condition required hospice care in order to control her pain. She had told me numerous times that she was tired of living and ready to "go." Yet, I believe it still was hard for her to accept that she needed hospice care and what that meant. Read more →


You already know what may be gained by giving up your job and becoming the primary full-time caregiver for your parents. You would benefit from knowing firsthand how they are faring day and night. You could save them from paying for in-home care or adult day care. Read more →


Of course, other people’s needs and desires will factor into your care decisions to some extent. However, clarifying your own position will help you find common ground while caregiving. The sooner you have this conversation with yourself, the better. Read more →


GCMs are responsible for creating individualized care plans for each client while keeping their lifestyle, physician orders and personal goals in mind. These professionals then work with a senior’s entire care team, which can include family members, professional caregivers, Read more →