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Combinations of several medications heighten this risk. People with dementia symptoms should have all medications checked by their primary physician, and possibly by a neurologist. Read more →


We don’t trust outsiders to provide the loving care that we do. We are motivated by love. Right or wrong, we feel that for them it’s just a job. Read more →


Fecal incontinence is not nearly as common as urinary incontinence. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) says that in a study involving older adults, 25 percent had moderate, severe, or very severe urinary leakage but only about eight percent had moderate, severe, or very severe bowel leakage. Still, that is not an insignificant number so the causes bear considering. Read more →


The only way to deal with this stigma is to work toward educating ourselves and others through awareness efforts. The hope is that with time, the public as well as those who are personally affected by incontinence can understand that while inconvenient, incontinence can be dealt with. Read more →


Dear Classic: I’m sorry about your struggle. Incontinence is a hard thing for any adult to adjust to, but your interest in restoring classic cars could be a terrific motivator for you. Society’s problem, of course, is that we grow up feeling that not being able to manage one’s bladder and/or bowels is babyish. Read more →


Dear Mom's Helper: Dementia of any kind makes nearly every aspect of self-care and caregiving by others much harder to manage. Your mother's fortunate to have you in her corner. Some of these devices that collect urine can be helpful, as seems to be the case with your dad, but yes... Read more →


Dear KS: You are speaking for many family caregivers during COVID-19 who have found themselves alone and left with few choices for respite. Unfortunately, too, your siblings mirror many other families by denying to themselves that what you do is extraordinary, so they don’t feel compelled to accommodate your need for a break... Read more →


Dear Worried: One of the vital things that we do as caregivers is helping our older adult family members take necessary medications as prescribed, and question prescriptions that could be unnecessary. Read more →


...The NIH is not saying that you should stop taking these medications if you are on one, but their information does suggest that you may want to discuss this risk with your doctor. Perhaps there is a better choice for you. Read more →


Dear Scared: This must be not only distressing for you but as your signature tells us, scary. I’m so sorry that you’re going through such a hard time. Your Dad's behavior change could stem from any number of things, but they will all need medical intervention, so you’ll likely want to set up an appointment – by video if that’s necessary – with his doctor. Read more →