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Dear JY: You’re a good daughter, so don’t let your parents or anyone else make you feel guilty for needing to continue work both for income and fulfillment. No adult child should be required to move in with their parents to become a full-time caregiver unless this is their choice. Even if doing so is their first... Read more →


We may know in our hearts for a long time that assisted living or nursing home care is necessary but we don’t want to make that change. We don’t trust outsiders to provide the loving care that we do. Read more →


...For this reason, telling her that her incontinence pad is leaking, and she needs to change will likely be met with a confused look or worse – anger and resentment. Read more →


He locked one in-home care aide out of his home, let another inside but was rude to her, and thoroughly enjoyed one young man but only because they could discuss golf together... Read more →


The Alzheimer’s Association uses the following criteria to illustrate issues in mild or early-stage Alzheimer’s disease: Problems coming up with the right word or name, trouble remembering names when introduced to new people, challenges performing tasks in social or work settings... Read more →


...Losing our parents turns our lives upside-down. I remember my sister telling me, after our mother died, that I was now the “family matriarch.” Read more →


Palliative care and hospice are related in that they both provide comfort care. The difference is that palliative care is for people who need comfort care while they are being treated for their medical diagnoses. Palliative care is delivered by a specially trained team... Read more →


Dear KJ: This is sad as well as frustrating for you. Her need to see you isn’t unusual in the later stage of Alzheimer’s, but when it happens, any caregiver would find it exhausting. Her behavior is generally known as shadowing and... Read more →


Dear WW: I’m so sorry! You aren’t alone with this frustration but I’m sure it often seems that you are, particularly when changing your dad’s sheets in the middle of the night. People who live with dementia will nearly always develop incontinence if they live into the last stages. That is because age or other risk factors aside... Read more →


Dear CV: I’m sorry about your mom’s health. We can feel so helpless when we watch a loved one suffer especially when the doctors to whom we look for advice seem to give up. Palliative care and hospice are related in that they both provide comfort care. The difference is that palliative care is for people who need comfort... Read more →