Entries categorized "Alternative treatments" Feed

...Nancy had spent years in therapy learning to cope with her childhood issues. Through hard work, she learned to forgive her father for his lack of involvement and the fact that he didn’t put a stop to the abuse her mother doled out. She’d learned that Read more →


...Few of us like to consider the fact that our parents will die, but nothing will change this truth. In actuality, avoiding end-of-life discussions and failing to help aging loved ones prepare for this inevitability can make the whole experience more difficult Read more →


...Some of the cuts you make are obvious. If you’ve been volunteering significant time to a fun project, but it’s not one of your life’s priorities, you may need to take a break. Other relationships aren’t so easily altered, so hurt feelings — and even marriage problems — can arise. First Read more →


...Avoid a confrontational tone or attitude. In fact, you might find it helpful to talk more generally about what’s going on in their life and maybe even in yours. Once establishing some level of comfort, try to find out what is behind this lack Read more →


When people have dementia, much of the learned behavior toward food safety may be forgotten. They'll do what comes naturally. It may not have bothered you when your teenage son drank milk from the carton, but somehow seeing your mother do the same can be upsetting. Licking peanut butter off of a knife Read more →


Not Everyone Is Cut Out to Be a Caregiver

...Just because someone decides against personally providing total care to a loved one doesn’t necessarily constitute indifference or abandonment. Many will visit, arrange other sources of care, handle financial issues, monitor their parents’ health and advocate for them. In actuality, they are providing a degree of care, Read more →


...Delusions are another type of false beliefs that can present in elders with Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. Unlike confabulations, which are related to memory recall, delusions tend to affect multiple aspects of a dementia Read more →


...Here’s another puzzler. My mother-in-law, Alice, was in a care facility, where she’d flourished despite her dementia progressing in the sad way that it does. But then, Alice took a turn for the worse when came down with pneumonia. She was given antibiotics, Read more →


...Understand that hospice is simply care that helps a dying person live his or her last months as pain-free as possible, and when possible, in a way that is meaningful to them. You and a hospice chaplain or other support person can explain to the ill person Read more →


Dear ME: I'm deeply sorry about both of your losses. As you mentioned, my family experienced the deaths of both of our parents close together, as well. We had five months separating them, so we had a little more time to adjust... Read more →