Entries categorized "Alternative treatments" Feed

...Here’s another puzzler. My mother-in-law, Alice, was in a care facility, where she’d flourished despite her dementia progressing in the sad way that it does. But then, Alice took a turn for the worse when came down with pneumonia. She was given antibiotics, Read more →


...Understand that hospice is simply care that helps a dying person live his or her last months as pain-free as possible, and when possible, in a way that is meaningful to them. You and a hospice chaplain or other support person can explain to the ill person Read more →


Dear ME: I'm deeply sorry about both of your losses. As you mentioned, my family experienced the deaths of both of our parents close together, as well. We had five months separating them, so we had a little more time to adjust... Read more →


...The questions above address important issues at the very heart of caregiving. Unfortunately, many of these concerns do not arise until family caregivers are feeling overwhelmed and depleted or until some area of their lives begins to deteriorate Read more →


...With AD, short-term memory is destroyed first. Therefore, while your spouse or parent may not know you as you look today (short-term memory), if you pulled out a photo album showing you 20 or 30 years ago, the person may recognize "you" immediately (long-term memory). Read more →


...According to the Alzheimer’s Association, Alzheimer’s patients typically live four to eight years after diagnosis but can live up to 20 years. Since AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, dementia caregivers can expect their responsibilities and stress Read more →


...For a while, my mom's disease consisted of minor memory loss, and she was able to be a fairly active part of my dad's care team after his surgery left him demented. However, as is to be expected, her condition worsened and I was soon coping with both of my parents' odd and forgetful behaviors. For example, their wedding anniversary was the day after Christmas. I would always bring to Read more →


We knew Dad was wearing down. He didn’t have long to live, but did he have to be in such discomfort? I wanted him under hospice care, but the doctor was adamant that he still wasn’t ready... Read more →


For instance, as leaving the house becomes more of a hassle and friends develop their own mobility issues, there are fewer opportunities for elders to socialize. Household tasks like cooking, cleaning and laundry grow increasingly challenging, so some seniors may... Read more →


Nearly anyone in your situation would be struggling to stay positive, but I can suggest some tools that might help. Let’s start with the fact that it’s unrealistic to expect yourself to be a positive caregiver every minute. You are trying to help your dad... Read more →