Entries categorized "Grief and Death" Feed

...No matter how difficult or stressful caregiving becomes, we can wind up feeling lost once this job inevitably comes to an end. Our natural grief may even be accompanied by a sense of relief, especially if we cared for loved ones who suffered Read more →


...With AD, short-term memory is destroyed first. Therefore, while your spouse or parent may not know you as you look today (short-term memory), if you pulled out a photo album showing you 20 or 30 years ago, the person may recognize "you" immediately (long-term memory). Read more →


When a person becomes a caregiver, their world and their social circle tend to shrink. This is especially true if a care receiver requires around-the-clock supervision, is homebound or has trouble communicating. While there is usually plenty to do around the house, things can get monotonous very quickly. Being cooped up Read more →


...The hospice staff kindly but firmly rejected my plan. Their chaplain handled informing Mom of the change to Dad’s care plan, and she was included in the services they offered. Of course, they were right to do this. It was painful for everyone involved, Read more →


...Of course, as her grandmother's disease progressed, communication became more difficult. Yet, Anna never gave up, and she continues to visit her grandmother regularly. During the later stages when her grandmother was seemingly unable to recognize friends and family Read more →


Most caregivers would have been devastated by the death of their loved ones before they took on this role. But when a care recipient has declined so significantly that they no longer resemble the person they used to be, it can be heartbreaking to imagine prolonging such a life. When a loved one is in pain Read more →


Dear LF: First things first. You are not failing. Dementia care is hard, and even the most determinedly positive person will have days when finding something to feel positive about is out of reach. Try not to be so hard on yourself. While a positive attitude overall Read more →


Dear WP: I’m so sorry, and yes, I understand. It would be normal for you to become somewhat complacent under the circumstances. Even when we know that this is the end of a loved one’s journey, it’s hard when they take the final step. When due to patient history the family Read more →


Slowly, Mom's body was slipping into death. She was comatose. Her extremities were mottling and, though her heart kept beating, she was completely unresponsive. Beth and I kept vigil over the three-day period that Mom went through the final death process. We stayed with her, held her hand, talked with her. During this time, the nursing home staff tried their best to divert Mavis and keep her from... Read more →


We knew Dad was wearing down. He didn’t have long to live, but did he have to be in such discomfort? I wanted him under hospice care, but the doctor was adamant that he still wasn’t ready... Read more →