Entries categorized "End-Of-Life" Feed

Dear DL: You’re right that I've addressed this, but I’ve received several similar questions within the last couple of weeks, so we’ll take another look. The articles you're referring to are probably about the current research stating that early signs of dementia may show up... Read more →


“My husband Ron, a lifelong academic, was diagnosed at age 56 with younger onset Alzheimer's disease (also known as early onset Alzheimer’s disease or EOAD) while he was still teaching. We’d always combined our finances, and though we were not wealthy... Read more →


Even taking that into consideration, caregiving is more of an art than a science. Yes, we look for information and input from trained experts, but each day and each circumstance will require flexibility on our part, and we’ll often be making split-second decisions. Again... Read more →


Yet, this company never rests on its past accomplishments. They’ve long recognized the challenge of nighttime incontinence so they’ve worked to develop the technology that can be a gamechanger for anyone who needs overnight incontinence protection... Read more →


The “Empowered Caregiver” is specifically designed to provide you with strategies and solutions for caring for your older parents in ways that can significantly reduce your own stress. Fodrini-Johnson begins with the all-important basics such as safety concerns and navigating legal issues. From there, she moves forward to assist you... Read more →


One seemingly normal day, Don, healthy and energetic, had just bounded up the stairs of the couple’s historic home to tell Kathi that he was on board with the remodeling project they’d discussed, when he suffered a life-altering stroke. Kathi would become Don’s caregiver for the next six years before his death... Read more →


Emergency room doctor Kevin Haselhorst had an epiphany while he tried valiantly to save an elderly man who’d been through one too many traumas. His book, “Wishes To Die For: A Caregiver’s Guide to Advance Care Directives,” was the first step toward a new advocacy. Dr. Haselhorst continues to work toward helping people understand the importance of healthcare directives and the ability to make their own decisions about end-of-life care. Curious about more of Dr. Haselhorst’s views, the Candid Caregiver contacted him through email for the following interview. Read more →


Mention a wonderful new assisted living that your friend’s mother just moved into. Mention some exciting new upgrades to in-home bathrooms that are actually good for everyone’s safety. Then, turn the conversation elsewhere... Read more →


My next thought was of Mom, in the bed next to Dad’s in the nursing home who simply couldn’t bear to watch. She had been unable to fully participate in Dad’s last hours due to her heavy pain medication, and she needed me with her. A curtain blocked Dad’s body from where I sat with Mom. I tried... Read more →


When my dad died, my mother had dementia. She didn't have Alzheimer's, but she was in a stage of dementia where her short-term memory was not good. Being human, she was also good at denial... Read more →