Entries categorized "MenopauseProstate" Feed

“I underwent a radical prostatectomy in April 2015 at age 60. This was with the now old-fashioned open surgery because I had had bilateral hernia repair with plastic mesh in 2005 and that made use of robot-assisted Read more →


Each year after Thanksgiving, I would make my rounds, decorating each elder’s apartment or nursing home room, planning how we would split our time between the visits, and striving to meet everyone’s needs. The guilt over taking so much time from my kids ate at me. The guilt over my mother not having the Christmas celebration she so coveted ate at me. My mother-in-law did not seem to care... Read more →


The average age of menopause for women in the United States is 51, however, there is a large variance due to overall health and genetics, as well as surgical causes. Most women experience the hormonal changes that lead up to this life change in their 40s, with the early phase being considered perimenopause... Read more →


Most younger men don’t spend a lot of time considering the health of their prostate. However, around the age of 50, they’ll likely find that their physicians want to check out prostate health both physically and through blood work known as a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test. The PSA is not a perfect test... Read more →


...Let’s start with the fact that it’s unrealistic to expect yourself to be a positive caregiver every minute. You are trying to help your dad live well with his Alzheimer’s diagnosis as well as looking at the fact that your mom may not survive her cancer for any length of time. Give yourself credit for persevering Read more →


However, the reality is that many adults will continue to live with incontinence. This wouldn’t be such a challenge if not for the stigma... Read more →


It’s sad that we tend to equate even intermittent issues of incontinence with being a baby when the reality is that many health changes can lead to various degrees of incontinence for adults... Read more →


...Sadly, this fact goes unrecognized, so adults with incontinence generally feel a degree of shame or self-blame. Some are even overtly shamed by friends or family. Read more →


“While it may be overwhelming at first, urinary incontinence is the most common type of incontinence among adults. Other common types of incontinence among adults include urge incontinence when you have a strong impulse Read more →


...Young people would like to see this condition normalized to some extent. We are not less competent just because we need to use incontinence products. Can you please spread the word? – Shining Light on the problem Read more →