Entries categorized "Minding Our Elders Column" Feed

As an example, for many older women, family gatherings have often been a large part of their identity. They may well remember the celebratory meals that their mothers and grandmothers prepared. It is likely that they hope their family will also remember their meals on special occasions long after they are gone. Read more →


The nursing home featured an incredible outdoor space complete with a resident-tended vegetable garden, raised flower beds with wheelchair access, large trees, and an overhead trellis full of hanging planters and climbing vines that provided ample shade. Read more →


Dear TY: Since there are numerous reasons why older adults may experience changes in how they walk (what doctors call our gait), you're right to be concerned. Shuffling can be one of these changes, but so can a drop foot gait, an off-kilter gait or simply a significantly slower than normal gait. Read more →


Dear PT: Your note touched me deeply. While your feelings are normal, you have the insight to know that they are off track. It takes a big person to recognize their shortcomings and deal with them without blaming others, so you have my admiration. Read more →


As we talked, Nancy described the inner turmoil she was facing as her parents got older. She grew up with a physically and emotionally abusive mother, and her father was gone much of the time, doing what most men of that generation did: making a living to support his family. Therefore, he wasn’t around to “interfere” with the raising of the children. Read more →


ad had, indeed, gone to medical school at the University of Minnesota, but that was before World War II. He took some time off to be an archaeologist and then the war broke out. During maneuvers in the Mohave Desert, Dad passed out from the heat, hitting his head Read more →


Dear GT: I’m so sorry. It brings tears to think of how horrible it would have been to not at least see my dad in person for a length of time, but especially on these special days. My empathy for you and other caregivers runs deep. Read more →


...My Mom used the Egosan maxi incontinence briefs for years while she was incontinent with Alzheimer’s. I was lucky to stumble upon Egosan.. this brief was amazing... it was unbelievably absorbent and comfortable for my Mom. Read more →


Thank you, Dad, for being my dad. You were, to me, the best father possible. If I ever failed to treat you with the respect you deserved, please forgive me. I tried my imperfect best to let you know that I’ve always respected you. Happy Father’s Day, Dad. I will forever be proud to be your daughter. Read more →


Before my father developed dementia, he had other health problems that required someone to attend to his needs while he healed. At that time, my mother was able to provide most of his care, but I'd often sit with him to give her a break. Those moments with Dad are now some of my most precious memories. Read more →