Entries categorized "Senior Housing" Feed

Within those conversations, you’ll likely see opportunities to discuss their ideal wishes. Even if they are already at a stage where they probably should make adjustments in how they are living, approach it by asking how they see their future. Read more →


The less obvious part is what I call “creep up.” That is what happened to me both in the number of people who needed help as well as each person’s increasing needs. In “creep up,” you handle the little things, and it’s not a huge deal. You add a little more and manage a crisis or two. Okay, you did it. Then, well... Read more →


...Therefore, rather than concentrate only on drugs, we need to help caregivers – and yes professionals – better understand how to help people living with dementia cope with the negative aspects of their illness so that they can live the best life that they can. Read more →


You as an adult child may want safety to come first. However, if your parents’ independence is completely stripped away, they may simply give up. Know your parents and then try to help them find a balance. Read more →


Dad was the true heart-breaker. He had surgery for complications from a World War II brain injury. Not only did the surgery fail, it put him into a paranoid dementia and introduced a voice in his head who we came to call Herman. The shock of his personality change after the... Read more →


Observe the staff. Note how the members of the staff interact with one another. Is there respect shown between them regardless of their job? When I saw how well the staff members interacted at the facility where my loved ones lived... Read more →


Regardless of who moves in with whom, the decision to cohabitate with aging parents is a serious one that affects all relationships within a family, careers, finances, and the physical and mental health of everyone involved. For some, the arrangement works out fine. Two or even three generations residing... Read more →


n my experience, I’ve found that it isn’t always seniors who avoid talking about death. Some do, of course, but many of our aging loved ones would like to discuss the legal and financial arrangements they’ve made, as well as their preferences for end-of-life care... Read more →


For some, the arrangement works out fine. Two or even three generations residing in the same home can be a good thing. Multigenerational living works best when there is plenty of space so that everyone can get the privacy they need. Additional factors include mutual Read more →


Regardless of who moves in with whom, the decision to cohabitate with aging parents is a serious one that affects all relationships within a family, careers, finances, and the physical and mental health of everyone involved. For some, the arrangement works out fine. Two or even three generations residing... Read more →