Entries categorized "Stroke" Feed

The researcher's stress, that solid conclusions can't be determined at this time because cognitive problems can cause people to withdraw, therefore placing them at higher risk for dementia, Read more →


Research continues to show that the arts enhance quality of life for people who have health problems, including Alzheimer's disease and strokes. Read more →


Make your facial expression pleasant when appropriate. Even if you don’t feel like smiling, the physical act may boost your own mood. Read more →


Dear Carol: My husband has vascular dementia due to strokes and uses a wheelchair.  I’ve been his sole caregiver for over a decade but a year ago it was obvious that my body was breaking down from the physical work and emotional exhaustion of 24-hour care. Read more →


Dysphagia is a swallowing impairment that can occur after someone has a stroke or any type of brain injury. Dysphagia is also a concern with Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis (MS), oral cancer, and many other injuries and diseases. Read more →


Dear Candid Caregiver: My husband and I have been married 25 years and have raised two children. Just as we were thinking that we’d be able to travel because the kids are old enough to be on their own, my in-laws started having one health problem after another. Read more →


Caregivers can also find themselves in a cycle of bouncing from one emergency to the next. Juggling crises is a significant part of what we do, Read more →


Author Inspired To Help Other Caregivers In Need By Establishing Foundation

When people think about caregiving spouses, they often think of older adults. We only have to look at a young mother diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis (MS), a young husband diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), or in this case, a woman who’s healthy husband had a sudden, massive stroke Read more →


The first time it happens many caregivers find themselves choking back tears. They try a logical approach although they’ve long realized that logic is not effective when communicating with a person living with dementia. But to be accused of stealing your dad’s hearing aid? Your mom’s sweater? Read more →