Entries categorized "TheCandidCaregiverColumn" Feed

Read on to read about three other family caregivers give us a peek into their lives as care providers for someone who lives with dementia: Read more →


Furthermore, drowsiness generally corresponds to brain function slowing down, and that can persist into the next day, even when an older person is no longer feeling drowsy. Read more →


Although there’s a long way to go before Alzheimer’s and other types of dementia are well understood, studies have shown that keeping the body and brain active throughout life may at least delay dementia symptoms. Happily, staying active is not all work. Hobbies can be healthy. Read more →


Caregivers are often isolated by the nature of their responsibilities. Some can’t leave home without arranging for someone to come and care for their loved one. Read more →


Dear Candid Caregiver: My dad enjoys going to the park and watching kids play. Since I try hard to give him the best life he can have considering that he has Alzheimer’s disease, Read more →


Now, my dad has been diagnosed with mixed dementia, which, in his case, means Alzheimer’s and possibly Lewy body dementia, so their dreams are pretty much canceled. Read more →


Fear and anxiety are two disturbing symptoms exhibited by many people with Alzheimer’s disease. These symptoms are completely understandable, considering the fact that people with dementia are often confused about their surroundings. Read more →


The benefits of relaxation, improved flexibility and mental focus can be considerable since the combination of these factors contributes to an overall sense of wellbeing. Read more →


I first came across the term care partner in conjunction with Alzheimer’s disease. This, at first glance, would seem to be the last place where this term fits. People with Alzheimer’s need someone to take over their lives, right? The answer, of course, is nothing could be farther from the truth. Read more →


Hullar said that if we turn the lights off, we tend to sway a bit more than we do when we can see. "This study suggests that opening your ears also gives you information about balance," he explained. Read more →